An Illustrated Timeline of Alexander, Maine 

* THE LAND 13000 YEARS AGO  * EXPLORERS, BATTLES, REBELLION FROM 1000 TO 1774  *  TURNING LAND INTO MONEY FROM 1781 TO 1795  *  PUTTING ALEXANDER ON THE MAP FROM 1785 TO 1808  *             EARLY SETTLERS FROM 1808 TO 1825        *    YEARS OF GROWTH 1830       *     READY OR NOT FOR WAR ~ 1860 TO 1865     *    FARM ANIMALS BECAME THE CASH CROP – 1866 to 1900      *   THRU THE TAX COLLECTORS EYES - 1914   BOUND FOR EXTINCTION 1970       *  GROWING AGAIN         *  THE NEW MILLENNIUM  *
 

CHAPTER 6 – YEARS OF GROWTH FROM 1830'S THROUGH 1850'S

1830 CENSUS – 336

1831 William Spring of Alexander named a coroner by Washington County Commission

1832 Jesse Stephenson appointed Alexander’s first post master

1838 DAMON SET OFF prepared by John Dudley – 1990

“CHAPTER 407: An act to set off so much of a lot of land belonging to John K. Damon, as lies in the town of Cooper, and annex the same to the town of Alexander” was approved by the Maine State Senate and House of Representatives on February 22, 1838. This was a result of a petition signed by 37 inhabitants of Alexander dated September 28, 1837.

John K. Damon’s home was on the Green Hill Road in Cooper. The petition claimed that Damon had a small amount of land in Alexander and that “many and great inconveniences’ were caused by having part of his farm in Cooper.

The lot set off was 50 rods wide (North to South) and one mile long, totaling 100 acres. It was bounded on the South (Cooper) by land of Daniel Lane and Horatio Greenlaw.

The set off does not appear on either the 1861 map of Washington County or the 1881 Atlas.

In 1899 the selectmen of Cooper and Alexander met to perambulate the line between the towns. They determined that the line was in dispute. In April 1900 the Supreme Judicial Court of Maine appointed three commissioners “to determine the lines in dispute, describe them by courses and distance, and make, set and mention suitable monuments and marks for the permanent establishment of such lines.” The commissioners were Benjamin E. Gardner a Calais lawyer, Samuel Hayward, a Cooper selectman and Charles E. Tyler, an Alexander selectman. These men completed their task and reported back to the court in December 1900. Their report indicated that the Damon Set Off does exist and that the line between Alexander and Cooper is not straight.

Dyer Crosby, grandson of Daniel Lane supplied much of the information given here. Below we list the Inhabitants of Alexander who signed John K. Damon’s Petition. Thirty-one are listed in Alexander Vital Records compiled by Sharon Howland. The other six on this hand written list of signatures are marked with an asterisk

INHABITANTS OF ALEXANDER – who signed the petition, in order.

Six with asterisks are not found elsewhere in Alexander records.

John K. Damon - Abijah Crosby * - Cornelius Lyons, Jr.

John G Taylor - Asa Robbins - Alphephias Lyons

John B. Tyler - Jesse Stephenson - Nathan Pease*

George W. Flood - George Tyler - Sylvanus Fogg*

Paul Morse - Belcher Tyler - Hiram Berry

Job Chase - Benjamin Buzzell - Asa Libby

Daniel or David Gooch - John Perkins - John Gray

James S. Chase - Abadiah Blackwood* - Richard H. Libby

John Gooch - Elias Lyon - Peter Flood

Ebenezer Gooch - Cornelius Lyon - Giles Hutchins

Robert Kendall - Jeremiah Frost - William Pearder*

Daniel G. Tyler - Greenwood Lyons - Jeton Menies*

Joel Gooch

1840 Census 513: ninty-six homes existed, a number not exceeded until the late 20th century

1841 John G. Taylor died, he was our first town clerk

1848 Manly Butterfield Townsend died, was President of the Maine State Senate

1850 The population reached 544, the greatest ever recorded

1
850 ROADS IN ALEXANDER DRAWN ON JONES 1808 LOT PLAN
The roads on this map were drawn by John Dudley. Names are as found in 2013. Roads that are not public today are marked with an asterisk. The Airline was called Blacks Road in 1850.

5
1850 – A PIVOTAL YEAR FOR ALEXANDER – 1850

This information first appeared in Special Issue 15, January 2010. It was prepared by John Dudley.

Now we explore the year 1850, when our population was greater than any time before or since. According to the census, it was 544 individuals. Of course we can’t tell why so many people from so many places settled here, or why they left. But we can tell a little of what Alexander was like in 1850.

Did Alexander residents talk much about world and national events? Did they remember that neighbors William Crockett and Jesse Stephenson had fought for this country during the War of 1812? When they passed the Townsend place, did they remember that Manly had been in the Aroostook War in 1839? Did they know that their town was named for Alexander Baring, and that he, as Lord Ashburton, had represented England in 1842 when the border between the United States and Canada was established? We know that they knew about gold in California!

How many men voted? Would our residents know that General Zachary Taylor had become President in 1849 and that he died on July 9, 1850? What did they know about Millard Fillmore, the new President? What did they know about Readfield’s John Hubbard, Maine’s new governor? We can’t answer those questions or many more with no diaries, local newspapers or other documents to help.

We do know where most people lived and can make quite good guesses where the others lived. We also can get a picture of neighborhoods, the closeness of houses, the potential of work and social interaction.

Asuph Sawyer of Cooper took the census of ‘Free Inhabitants of Alexander’ on August 27 – 31, 1850. That word ‘free’ reminds us that in some places in our country, not all were free, a slave was counted as 3/5 of a freeman. Sawyer also did the Agricultural Census of Alexander; Congress had ordered for the first time that this information be collected. Those two documents are the basis for this article.

Sawyer census tells that the residents were somewhat religious in that we had two churches, the Union Church that seated 150 and was valued at $300 and the Methodist Church seated 150. We have found no other evidence of any church building in Alexander prior to 1866. Where were these two churches? In the chapter on COMMUNITY LIFE we can learn more of religion.

The annual taxes raised for the state was $103 and for the county $70. Schools were supported with $250 and the three paupers with $200. All these taxes were in cash. The road tax was $1200, but this was paid in work. That tax was raised from real estate valued at $46750 and personal property worth $8803.

We know what some individuals did with their time? One hundred seventy six were attending school when Asuph visited. Another 54 more were students who would attend school later in the year. Where did these scholars attend school? Alexander had five district schoolhouses, #1 - Four Corners, #2 - Hale, #3 – Loverin (Robb Hill), #5 – Breakneck and #6 Andrew Little District. On Arm Road, but only three were operating at the time of the census. We know that children living near Princeton were educated at the District #1 schoolhouse in South Princeton; and those near Crawford were schooled in that town. We know that Caroline Cole and Amanda Tyler both taught, for $10.00 and $14.00 per term and that the town paid Henry P. Whitney $52.00 for the same.

The men as heads of households were mostly described as farmers or laborers. On the Agricultural Census even the laborers had farmland, crops and livestock. What was the difference between a laborer and a farmer? How many of the men went into the woods each winter? Most of the 76 houses had a woman, usually a wife, with no occupation listed. We won’t attempt to describe how hard these women worked with no electricity, no running water, no nearby grocery store, no department store for clothing….

How rich or how poor were these people? One way to measure wealth in a rural society was to find a value of each man’s farm. We’ll use the 1850 Agricultural Census for that, even though this will not report cash earned in woods work or on the log drive, or for butter or farm produce sold.

Alexander farmers raised an average of 250 bushels of potatoes per acre, 15 bushels of wheat, 25 bushels of oats and 20 bushels of barley. Wages for a farm hand averaged $16 a month plus board. Day laborers earned 80 cents per day with board, or $1.00 a day with no board. A carpenter earned $1.75 a day and supplied his own meals. If he boarded out, he could expect to pay $2.00 per week. Finally, a male domestic was worth $1.00 a week plus board. Female domestics were not mentioned!

Who were the town leaders? At the March town meeting, the following were elected to handle the responsibility of running the town, Clerk was William Spring; Selectmen - Claudius M. Huff, Asa Libby and John K. Damon, assessor - Nathaniel S. Townsend, tax collector - Richard H. Libby, and school committee - A. K. P. Townsend.

Sources: Sharon Howland compiled vital records of Alexander and area towns which includes the 1850 census records, cemetery gravestone inscriptions and family records. A-CHS files created by Pliney Frost provided additional information. We have used the 1861 Wallings Map of Washington County, deeds, letters from Bingham’s agents and some detective work to locate Alexander farms in 1850. Corrections, especially to where each family lived, are desired.

TRAVELS WITH ASUPH; ALEXANDER IN 1850

We will visit each house, as did Asuph Sawyer. We will find out who lived in each house and where they came from. Occupations will be listed and scholars’ names will be underlined. <We will next tell a little about most families in the years after Asuph’s visit> [We locate the house by lot number (see map above) and by E911 address if known. Most locations are known from maps or deeds. Some are noted as ‘likely’ in that the name on the census lists falls at a known or probable house site. A number of residents did not own the place listed]. And we will learn about each farm, rich or poor. It is August 1850. We will follow Asuph on his travels. ~ Asuph lived near where the Grange Hall stands in Cooper. He went north on the Breakneck Road to the Alexander town line where he starts his work and where we start our journey. Enjoy the trip.

STEPHEN BABCOCK was a 54-year-old farmer born at Hopewell, NB. His wife was Betsy Flood (42), Peter’s daughter. Their children were George (21), Martha (19), Stephen (18), Charles (16), Julia (14), Almira (11), Augustine (10), William (8), Lewis (6), Larry Lafayette (3) and Betsy (1). <Another child, Emma, was born in 1852. The family left Alexander before 1860. Augustine and William were then in Cooper and were Civil War soldiers>
[Lot 97; Breakneck Road nearest Cooper, site not found]
100 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $850; value improvements and machines – $15; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 1 other cattle; value livestock - $170; 8 bushels rye; 10 bushels oats; 16 tons of hay

REUBEN TUTTLE FENLASON was a 38-year-old laborer born in East Machias. His three older children were Irving (16), Reuben (14) Deborah (10) and Hannah (6). Their mother was Deborah Gooch who died. Reuben’s second wife, Livonia (19) was the mother of his other child, named for her mother, Livonia (10/12). Rebecca Garnet (23) was also in the household. < Reuben died in the well on Breakneck on August 10, 1852>
[Lot 97; Breakneck Road]
60 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; 1 milch cow

JOHN CROWLEY (40) described himself as a gardener. His wife Bridget (38) was called Biddy. Also in the house were James Foley (40) and John Magee (35), both laborers. Completing the household was Jane Fitzsimmons aged 14. All were born in Ireland. <nfi>
[Lot 97; Breakneck Road]
40 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500

EBENEZER GOOCH was 84 and his wife Betsey Seavey was 78. Living in this home was their son JOEL GOOCH, a 45 year old farmer, his wife Hannah (34) and their children Orinda (16), Augustus (10), Franklin (8), Henry (6) and Albert (1). The Gooch family was from East Machias. <Joel died in 1852, Ebenezer died in 1856 and Betsey died in 1857. This Gooch family left Alexander before 1860>
[Lot 97 Breakneck Road]
70 improved acres; 130 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; value improvements and machines – $25; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 1 other cattle; value livestock - $70; 100 bushels Irish potatoes; 300 pounds butter, value home manufactures - $20; value of animals slaughtered $15

MOSES J. HACKETT was a Maine born mechanic, 44 years old. His wife Charlotte Quimby Chase from New Brunswick was 34. Their children, all born in New Brunswick except Florence, were William (14), George (13), Samuel (11), Leroy (8), Emma (3) and Florence (10/12). Moses was a house carpenter from Calais when he purchased this farm “across from the red schoolhouse, formerly the south east school district, now District #5.
[Lot 97; Breakneck Road]
46 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $850; 1 horse; 4 milch cows; 4 other cattle; value livestock - $175; 60 bushels Irish potatoes; 400 pounds butter; 10 tons of hay

JOHN S. PHILLIPS (60) was a New Hampshire born farmer. His wife Isabelle Kennedy was 46 and born in Scotland. Their children, born in Maine, were James (19) a laborer and William (9). <Five more children born before 1850 are not listed in the census. John Phillips died in the Breakneck well on August 10, 1852. His widow moved to Calais.>
[Lot 97; Breakneck Road; site known]
35 improved acres; 55 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $1000; value improvements and machines – $40; 1 horse; 3 milch cows; 4 other cattle; 11 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $140; 85
bushels oats; 35 pounds wool; 200 bushels Irish potatoes; 14 bushels barley; value orchard crops - $15;
250 pounds butter; 10 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $40; value of animals slaughtered - $60

~ Here Asuph turns east onto the Burn Barn Hill Road ~

JOHN GOOCH, 47, was a farmer and brother of Joel. John’s wife was Eliza Jane Chase (37) from Princeton. John and Eliza were in Alexander by 1833. Their children were Charlotte (16), John C. (13), Mary (9), Eugene (8), George (7), Adaline (4), Oswald (3), and Frederic (11/12). Also living in the home was Jeremiah Gooch (27), a laborer and likely a son of John’s brother Daniel. <Three more children were born, Willis, John L. and Louisa. John C. died in 1855. Members of this family stayed in Alexander until after the 1880 census>
[Lot 98, likely on north side Burnt Barn Hill Road, near the high point of this hill; the Seth Damon place; only known house site on this road and probably the site of the barn that burned.]
46 improved acres; 160 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; value livestock - $50

~ Now Asuph heads toward Cooper on the Cooper Road, once called the North Union Road ~

LUKE STEVENSON (24) was born in Alexander, son of Jesse and Elizabeth. His bride of just a few days was Elizabeth Hammond (21). <They had three daughters born in the next decade, Annette, Irene and Emma. The family left Alexander after 1850. Luke married Martha Connick of Meddybemps in 1892 and returned to Alexander before 1900. He died here in 1904 and is buried in an unmarked grave on lot 106. Martha Hodsdon Connick was the widow of Levi Connick>
[Lot 101, likely near 669 Cooper Road, one of three house sites on Kelly McDonough’s lot]
40 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; 1 milch cow

PAUL MORSE was a 65-year-old farmer from Newbury, Massachusetts. His wife, Mary, born in Kings County, New Brunswick 53 years earlier, was a widow and had a son by her first marriage. That son was living with Paul and Mary; He was John William Henry Trask, born in Eastport, a 34-year-old laborer. <Paul died in 1855 and Mary in 1858. Are they buried in the field south of the house site? John Trask took over the farm.>
[Lot 106; site near 750 Cooper Road. This was the farm where John Taylor, Alexander’s first Clerk lived. Presently home for Hank and Maxine (Flood) Dinkins]
40 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; value improvements and machines – $20; 4 milch cows; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $120; 60 bushels Irish potatoes; 300
pounds butter; 10 tons of hay. Paul reported 20 pounds of wool in the past year even though he had no sheep at the census time.

JOHN KENDALL DAMON a farmer at age 46 was from Dennysville. His wife Elizabeth Gooch (43) was from East Machias. Their children were Roxana (16), John (15), Elizabeth (14), Hannah (13), Deborah (10), Diantha (7) and Uriah (6). John moved into Cooper after 1830 and lived next to the Alexander town line. In 1837 he petitioned the Legislature to have his farm set off into Alexander. This was done on February 22, 1838; that establishes the exact day John K. Damon became a resident of Alexander. <nfi>
[South of lot 112; site near 14 Green Hill Road, Francis Sullivan’s camp]
150 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $1000; value improvements and machines – $60; 1 horse; 5 milch cows; 6 working oxen; 2 other cattle; 1 swine; value livestock - $312; 150 bushels Irish potatoes; 200 pounds butter; 20 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $30;
value of animals slaughtered - $20

~ Asuph goes back north on the Cooper Road ~

JAMES GARNET was a Maine born farmer aged 33. Living with him was Ruth Garnet (66) and Daniel Garnet (13). Living with the family were brothers Wesley (23) and Levi (21) Flood, both laborers and sons of Peter and Lucy Snow Flood. Peter had died on August 27, 1845. The census taker visited in August 1850. In our vitals we find, “James Garnet and Mrs. Lucy Flood published on March 31, 1850.” Mrs. Lucy Flood was born in 1787. Her daughter Miss Lucy Flood was born in 1804. Being published is like marriage intentions. What was going on? Was James trying to gain ownership of the farm? And how did Rebecca Garnet (23) living with Reuben Fenlason fit into this mystery? <Lucy died on August 27, 1862. The Garnet family left Alexander before the 1860 census. Levi was in the Civil War.>
[Lot 112; site near 842 Cooper Road. This is the Peter Flood farm where Bruce Baker now lives]
62 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; value improvements and machines – $40; 1horse; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 1 swine; value livestock - $120;
60 bushels Irish potatoes; 100 pounds butter; 22 tons of hay

FRANCIS JAMES BURNS is listed as a 37- year old laborer in the 1850 census. He was born in Nova Scotia. His wife Elizabeth was the same age, but born in Maine. The tradition is that he was a brick maker. <The couple were in financial troubles and did not pay their property taxes for three years. In July 1850 the town sold their farm to James Stephenson. Elizabeth died on February 17, 1857 at Jesse Stephenson’s home. Francis does not appear on the 1860 census.>
[Lot 98 – at the foot of Gooch hill, cellar in the orchard opposite 10 Dwelleys Lake Road]
Francis owned 80 acres, 35 were improved. He had 1 milk cow and 1 other cattle, of no apparent value to the census taker. cash value of farm - $250

JESSE STEPHENSON was 66 and a farmer. He came from Cohasset, Massachusetts and met and married his wife Elizabeth Lilly at Eastport where it is said that Jesse was a merchant. They came to Alexander before 1816. Daughters Rachel (27) and Harriet (20) and sons Elisha (39), and James (33), both laborers, were at home along with Matthew Frane (21) and James Moore (20). Abigail Spencer Bonney (30), Elisha’s bride of a year is also in the home.
[Lot 94; 459 Cooper Road: Jesse built a sawmill in 1816 and a gristmill in 1820, both near his home at the outlet of Pleasant Lake. In 1829 he bought from Alexander Baring land including the mill site. Likely he was living on that lot since his arrival in town. Joe and Jane Manza live near site]
Jesse’s farm was valued at $2000. He had 80 acres of improved land and 890 acres that were unimproved. This acreage indicates he came to town with more cash than most. His implements were worth $125. He had 1 horse, 7 milking cows that gave 300 pounds butter, 1 pair oxen, 4 other cattle and 3 swine. His stock was valued at $200 and they went through 10 tons hay. He grew 11 bushels of peas and/or beans and 100 bushels potatoes. He slaughtered animals worth $100.

GEORGE TYLER, a 59-year-old farmer from Harpswell, Maine came to Alexander from Calais prior to 1830. His wife was Amelia Cummings Caldwell (58) of St. Andrews NB. With them were a daughter Mary Amanda (21) and a son, Daniel (29), a laborer. <George and Amelia both died within a decade and are buried at the Alexander Cemetery. Their son Belcher continues as a long time resident here.>
[Lot 88, site near 361 Cooper Road, ‘Tyler Corner’ where Arm and Cooper roads meet, Steve Knowles lives here]
50 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; 3 milch cows; 3 other cattle; value livestock - $60; 200 pounds butter; 3 tons of hay

~ Asuph Sawyer, our census taker, now turned west on the Arm Road, or the first part was then called the County Road ~

JESSE STEPHENSON, JR, 29, was born in Alexander. He married Sabrina Knight in December 1845. Their children were George (3), Elizabeth (2) and Sabrina (6/12). <Several more children were born after 1850, Jesse, Mary, John, Edgar and Mary>
[Lot 88, near 51 Arm Road (present home of Merle Knowles 3rd); Jesse’s sister Harriet & husband James P Hammond lived here in 1861]
In 1855 he bought lot 87 from Samuel Cottel and lived there. Had he set up housekeeping there by 1850? Eventually they had eight children. According to the census, Jesse, Jr. farmed 80 acres and had improved 30 of them giving his farm a value of $250. He had a milk cow, a pair of oxen and a swine, all worth $100.
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $250; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; 1 swine; value livestock - $100

SAMUEL COTTLE was a Maine born farmer aged 64. His wife Elizabeth Hatch was 69. They were in Alexander before 1820. Living with them in 1850 were a granddaughter Dolly (6), Charles Frost (17) and Frederic Pilky (39) a laborer. Dolly’s mother was Nancy who married Ephraim Brown. <Samuel died on June 12, 1867 in Augusta at the Insane Hospital. Elizabeth died in 1855; both are buried in Calais >
[Lot 78 and 87; near 159 Arm Road, presently home of Greg Luddington]
60 improved acres; 90 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; value improvements and machines – $200; 1 horse; 4 milch cows; 4 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 16 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $250; 22 bushels oats

SAMUEL COTTLE, Jr. (34) was a farmer and born in Alexander. Mary Jane Crafts, his wife was 23. Their children were Shepherd (5), Hampden (4) and Henry (1). Also living in the house was Sam’s brother John (32) and William Bailey (21), both laborers. <A daughter Maria was born on February 11, 1851 and Samuel. Jr. died in October 1857>
[Lot 78, cellar in woods east of Old County Road, ‘on his father’s lot, owner Foster Carlow, Jr calls this the Will Frost Place]
30 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $1000; value improvements and machines – $30; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 13 sheep; value livestock - $150; 40 bushels oats; 20 pounds wool; 8 bushels beans and peas; 70 bushels Irish potatoes; 12 bushels buckwheat; 150 pounds butter; value of animals slaughtered - $10

JOHN MOORE was born in 1795 in Ireland and came to Alexander before 1820. He married Nancy (Moholland) in 1823. John was a laborer. Their son Albion, also a laborer was still at home. <John and Nancy both died in the 1850s, and are buried in unmarked graves on their place. Albion continued living in Alexander until after 1860.>
[Lot 78; 204 Old County Road; cellar west of A-frame house; near the Arm Road]
30 improved acres; 10 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $250; 1 milch cow; 5 bushels beans and peas; 260 bushels Irish potatoes; 9 bushels buckwheat; value orchard crops - $10; 300 pounds butter; 20 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $30; value of animals slaughtered - $40. John reported 32 pounds of wool in the past year even though he had no sheep at the census time.

~ Asuph continued west on what then and now is Arm Road ~

DAVID BAILEY, son of Nathaniel and Mary (Frost) Bailey was born in Baileyville but likely in Alexander before 1820 with his father and family. As an adult he lived many years in Baileyville. He and his first wife had seven children between 1827 and 1838. In 1850, David was 52 years old and his second wife Rebecca Tucker, listed as 23, but more likely 30; his parents were living with him, and in the household was hired man William Porter (26) and his wife Lavina (24).
[Lot 77; Spaulding place, north side Arm Road, foundation visible in Clayton Blake’s pasture]
15 improved acres; 25 unimproved acres; value of farm - $250; 1 milch cow; value of livestock - $15

CLAUDIUS HUFF, a 32-year-old farmer, was born in St. George NB. His wife (32) was Ann M. Lane, Likely born in Baring. Their children Charles (6), John (5), Bion (3) and twins Amanda and Amelia (8/12). <A daughter Mary Louisa was born on May 2, 1853 and Ann Huff died on September 21, 1853. Claudius remarried. He remained in Alexander until his death sometime after 1880.>
[Lot 77; 311 Arm Road, likely the oldest house in town, home today of Rose Niles Williams and family]
20 improved acres; 20 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $850; value improvements and machines – $60; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $180; 20 tons of hay

~ Asuph here skips by the Dunn place and follows the now abandoned Arm Road south ~

WILLIAM CROCKETT, a 66-year-old farmer, came from New Hampshire. His wife Mary (65) came from New York. William served in Oliver Shedd’s Company at Eastport in the War of 1812. They arrived in Alexander from Calais before 1820. In 1850, living in the home were Sylvanus Seavey (25), a laborer, his wife Cordelia (21) and their children Delia (4) and Cordelia (2). I suspect that Cordelia was the youngest daughter of William and Mary. <Mary Crockett died in 1855 and likely is buried in an unmarked grave in the family cemetery south of their house site.>
[Lot 92; 63 Crawford Road, cellar hole evident, across road from graves, near original intersection of Breakneck Road and Arm Road, later called Sears Corner]
25 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; value improvements and machines – $10; 2milch cows; 3 other cattle; 11 sheep; value livestock - $50. The Machias Union in 1855 stated that ‘Mr. Crockett has one of the largest orchards of fruit trees we have seen in Eastern Maine, they number nearly three hundred including damson plums.’

~ Asuph now goes west toward Crawford on the Arm Road, what we now call the Crawford Road ~

JOSEPH GODFREY, a farmer, was 25 and his wife Rachel Morrisa (Moraisey) was 26; both were from Nova Scotia. Their children were Eliza (7), Ruth (5), Charles (4), James (2) and Rebecca (4/12). <Three more children were born into this family, Josephine, Joseph and John. Joseph and family later moved to the Dunn Place at 329 Arm Road. Several members of this family lie buried at the Alexander Cemetery>
[Gore lot next to Crawford; north of Crawford Road, remains of foundation just north of road]
20 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $350; value improvements and machines – $20; 2 milch cows; 1 other cattle; value livestock - $70

GODFREY LYDICK was a 54-year-old farmer born in New York. His wife was Elizabeth Noddin, 46, from Hopewell, New Brunswick. They came to Alexander prior to 1828. Their children at home in 1850 were Mary (22), David (20), Solomon (19), James Godfrey (17), Michael (15), Elizabeth (12), Isaiah (9), Sarah (6) and Emily (3). The four older boys were listed as laborers. < The Lydicks left Alexander in a hurry. In 1858 Lydick petitioned the Legislature to have his farm set off into Crawford. On April 2, 1859 the petition was approved, and the family moved to Crawford, lock stock and barrel.>
[Gore lot next to Crawford; south side of Crawford Road, The cellar in bushes in an overgrown field is now in Crawford as result of Lydick Setoff]
20 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $350; value improvements and machines – $10; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 other cattle; 8 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $120

~ And Asuph returns east to the road to Breakneck along the south shore of Pleasant Lake ~

HENRY JAMES FENLASON (33) was a Maine born farmer. His wife was Eliza (28). They had two children, Sarah (7) and James (5), both born in Crawford. Henry was in Alexander with his family prior to 1820. <Henry and Eliza moved to Princeton.>
[Northeast corner of lot 97; east of Breakneck Road, cellar east of snowmobile trail]
30 improved acres; 120 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 other cattle; value livestock - $95; 10 tons of hay

~ and Asuph returns to the Arm Road ~

ALFRED KNIGHT, a 44-year-old farmer from Calais, was married to Hannah (34) from Baileyville. Their children were George, a laborer (17), Hannah (12), Charles (2) and James (1/12). <nfi>
[Likely lot 91, cellar just north of present Crawford Road and just west of abandoned Arm Road, the children went to school in Crawford]
20 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $300; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 other cattle; 8 sheep; value livestock - $95; 8 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $10;

LEVI COBB DUNN was a 38 year old Methodist – Episcopal clergyman. His wife Sally Carle (32) was from Princeton. Their children were Russell (10), Elmira (6), Olin (2), and Laura (11/12). Also living in the home were Henry Scott (22) and Nancy Lane Scott (25). Henry was a laborer. Levi Dunn came to Alexander from Calais before 1820 with his parents. <Levi’s sons Russell and Emery both died in the Civil War. As a Methodist minister, Levi moved often to numerous towns around Maine.>
[Lot 85; 329 Arm Road, cellar hole still evident at Foster Carlow’s farm]
35 improved acres; 15 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 2 other cattle; 1 swine; value livestock - $100; 10 bushels beans and peas; 30 bushels Irish potatoes; 20 tons of hay

~ Asuph traveled north along the Arm Road and up the Huff Road past the Huff House to the Blacks Road that today we call the Airline, then turned west ~

PHEBE SCOTT SCRIBNER, widow of Samuel who died in 1830, was 59 and head of the household. Phebe was from Machias at the time of her marriage. Living with her was her youngest child, George Stillman Smith Scribner (21) listed as a laborer. Also there were her daughter Caroline Elizabeth Huff (35) and her children Amanda (12), Theodore (10), Alice (5), Emma (1) and Francis (5/12). Caroline was twice widowed. Her first husband was Isaiah Foster and the two older children were his. Her second husband was John W. Huff and the two younger children were his. Also in the house were Mary J. Jeffrey (8) and James Jeffrey (8). Apparently, the twins were born in Halifax, NS and were living at Youngs Cove NB when their mother died. They were walked to Maine and given to Phebe Scribner. There has to be more to that story. <James was in Crawford in 1860 and returned there after serving in the Union Army during the Civil War. Mary Jane married Henry Dunsmore and lived in Princeton. Caroline eventually married Ben Strout and Ben’s daughter Charlotte married George Scribner. George ‘Still” remained in Alexander until the time of his death.>
[Lot 76; cellar behind house at 1886 Airline Road where Zela’s grandson Ed Powers now lives; hay rake on the foundation]
40 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; 1 horse; 6 milch cows; 3 other cattle; 1 swine; value livestock - $190; 100 bushels Irish potatoes; 200 pounds butter; 8 tons of hay;

EPHRAIM BROWN (39) was a laborer, a son of Samuel and Dorcas and likely born in Alexander. His wife was Nancy (Cottel) who was 31 years old. Nancy and Ephraim had married on February 8, 1849. His first wife was Phebe Farrar; His children in 1850 were Theophilus (12), Richard (10), Mary (8), Abigail (6), Michael & Rachel (4) and Orrington (1). <Ephraim and Nancy had more children, Josiah, Charles, Clement, Alice, Hampden and Theoplilus. The first Theoplilus died in the Civil War>
[Lot 75; 2020 Airline Road; cellar west of John Foley’s driveway, visible from highway]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $350; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $90

~ Brown’s being the last house in Alexander, Asuph now returns east on the Blacks Road. ~

WILLIAM COLE was a 51-year-old farmer born in Green, Maine. His wife Eliza (43) Chase was from St David’s Parish NB. They came from New Brunswick prior to 1830.Their children were Elizabeth (23), Caroline (21), Daniel (19), Eliza (17), Andrew (14), Thomas (13), Amos (8) and William. Three other children had been born and died before 1850. <nfi>
[Lot 64; north of Airline, cellar in woods west of Huff Road, about across from the Scribner place]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 1 other cattle; 8 sheep; value livestock - $80

NATHANIEL P. MESERVE was a New Hampshire born farmer 58 years old. He lived alone.
[Lot 54; cellar in John Knowles’ blueberry field about ¼ mile north of Airline Road]
40 improved acres; 120 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $700; value improvements and machines – $15; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 other cattle; 8 sheep; 2 swine; value livestock - $100; 120 bushels Irish potatoes; 10 tons of hay

BENJAMIN ADAMS STROUT (38) was a widowed laborer. He came to Alexander from Limington, Maine. His children were Charlotte (14), Emma (7) and Eliza (4). Luther Fenlason (26) was a laborer in the household as was his mother Sally (57) whose role may have been looking after the children; His wife Esther Bailey had died in May 1850. <Ben later married twice widowed Caroline Scribner Foster Huff. He moved east to across from the Cooper Road and had the stagecoach stop in Alexander from 1857 – 1887. His daughter Charlotte married G. S. S. Scribner, but deserted him and their children in the mid 1870s.>
[West half lot 55; site probably 1699 Airline Road, Bill White’s home; this is the northeast corner of the Four Corners]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500. The Machias Union in 1855 reported that Mr. Strout raised from half a bushel sowing, three barrels of excellent grain.

ANANIAH BOHANON was one of the first settlers in Alexander. He had come from Calais, was a farmer and was 62 years old. His wife was Amelia Campbell (58), also from Calais. Their children were James (20), a laborer, Samuel (17), Amanda (9) and Francis (7). Their daughter Amelia Bohanon Brown (30), widow of Elijah who died in September 1849 and their children Eliza (5) and George (2) lived in her parents house. Records indicate Amelia had six children die including a baby girl born 4 months after Elijah’s death. A daughter Margaret and her husband Henry Payson Whitney lived nearby as did sons John and William and their families. <Amelia died on February 7, 1857 and is buried in the family plot. Ananiah eventually moved to Minnesota to be with some of his children and died there.>
[Lot 65; west of Old County Road, cellar still evident in blueberry field, graves east of house site on knoll are hard to find, stones broken; Ananiah owned the southwest corner of the Four Corners]
60 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; 1 horse; 4 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 2 other cattle; 10 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $200; 55 pounds wool; 250 bushels Irish potatoes; 10 bushels buckwheat; 300 pounds butter; 12 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $35

SOLOMON OBIDIAH STROUT (49) came here from Limington and married Lydia Bailey (46). He was a farmer. The children at home were Solomon (23), a laborer, Rhoda (12), Viola (8), Eunice (5), Lydia (3) and Eliza (8/12). Jones Bohanon (24) a neighbors son and Archibald McCatharine (26) from Nova Scotia were both laborers living in the household. <Solomon and his first wife lie buried at the Alexander Cemetery>
[West half lot 66 and southeast corner of Four Corners; 1698 Airline Road would be site of house after it was moved from center of the lot. We know it was moved before 1861, The original cellar there still visible at center of lot]
30 improved acres; 150 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $700; value improvements and machines – $50; 1 horse; 4 milch cows; 20 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $150; 75 pounds wool; 100 bushels Irish potatoes; 300 pounds butter; 12 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $45; value of animals slaughtered - $30

STEPHEN DECATUR FROST a 35-year-old farmer was born in Calais but came to Alexander with his parents before 1830. His wife was Mary Ann Bean (28). Their children were Robert (11), Thomas B. (8), Wellington Augustus (6), Dresdin (4), Stephen (2) and Chauncey (4/12). Also in the home was Sally (20). <Four more children were born to this couple, Enos, Abner, Horace and Charles. Stephen D. Frost served in the Civil War.>
[East half lot 66; 1646 Airline Road, home of William Briggs; cellar about ¼ mile south of road in blueberry field with bushes growing around it]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $550; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 2 other cattle; 8 sheep; value livestock - $85

ABRAHAM BAILEY was a 48-year-old laborer born in Baileyville Brother of David. His wife Jane was 37. Their children were Sarah (16), Emily (13), Almira (12), Horatio (10), Stillman (6), Mary (5) and Martha (1). <At least two more children were born in this family, Theresa (1854) and James (1856). This family moved to Crawford before 1860.>
[Middle part lot 55; site likely 1646 Airline Road where Larry and Emma Hill live]
40 improved acres; 40 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $350; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; value livestock - $70

JAMES PERKINS, a farmer at 38 had married Martha Emery Bailey (33) of Baileyville. Their children were Daniel (9), James Madison (7), Samuel (4) and Phebe. (1). <Two girls were born after 1850. By 1860 this family was living in Crawford.>
[Lot 55; probably near 1605 Airline Road, home of Eleanor Fecteau, actually behind present house]
35 improved acres; 135 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $850; value improvements and machines – $16; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $115; 40 bushels oats; 5 bushels beans and peas; 18 bushels barley; 11 tons of hay

ISAIAH BAILEY, born in #7, now Baileyville, was 28 and a farmer. His wife Diadama (Chubuck) was 28. Their children were Roxanna (2) and Jasper (3/12). Also in the household were Isaiah’s mother Jane (Frost) Bailey (59), his brothers Simeon (20) and Joseph (23) and Joseph’s wife Amanda Perkins (19). <Three more children were born to this couple, Josiah (1851), Clara (1854) and Elisha
(1857). Amanda died in 1860; Diadama died on May 3, 1861. Isaiah enlisted in the Union Army on October 5, 1864.>
[West part lot 56; 1587 Airline Road, house site under David Goodine’s saw mill]
20 improved acres; 40 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; value improvements and machines – $30; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; 1 other cattle; value livestock - $150; 10
tons of hay

JOHN JAMES PERKINS was a 36-year-old farmer born at Grand Lake, New Brunswick. His wife was Sarah Perkins (37) was born at St. David’s Parish, NB. Their children were John (11), Margaret (9), Wesley (7), Alfred (6), Mary (3) and Augusta (1). Note: John and Joseph were brothers living in the same house. Mary and Augusta are listed under Joseph, but do belong to John. Living with the family was Margaret Ferris Perkins (64), John’s mother. <This family lived in Alexander for many, many years.>
[East part lot 56; 1461 Airline Road where Tim Sanford resides, house site likely west of driveway near highway]
30 improved acres; 25 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 other cattle; value livestock - $150; 150 pounds butter; 10 tons of hay. The Machias Union reported in 1855 that he sowed 35 bushels oats and will probably secure upwards of 300 bushels.

JOSEPH PERKINS was a 28-year-old farmer born at Grand Lake NB and his wife Elizabeth Ellsworth was 22. Their child was Hanford Albion (1). Included in the household were Joseph’s siblings Solomon (22) and Margaret (18). <Records indicate 12 more children were born into this family. Joseph fought in the Civil War and he and many of his family are buried in marked graves at the Alexander Cemetery.>
[Joseph sold the northeast corner of lot 57 to Robert Clark Brown in October 1852. I expect his home was near 1409 Airline Road, present home of Joey Wallace]
30 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; 2 milch cows; value livestock - $30; 20 tons of hay.

~ Here Asuph leaves the Airline and traveled up the McArthur Road, earlier called the Lyons Road or the Thistlewood Road ~

ROBERT KENDALL THISTLEWOOD a 44-year-old farmer was born in England. His wife, the widow Mary Bailey Bean was 50. The children in the household were Reuben (17), John K (9) and Susan Blackington (20). Susan Keen and Rueben Keen were Mary Bean’s children. Another son, Robert K. Scott Thistlewood (born 1839) is not listed in the home, but William Chambers (27) a laborer is in the home. <This family continued living here for many years and Robert is buried at the Alexander Cemetery>.
[The Thistlewood farm was on the ministerial lot, lot 48, north and west of the present day McArthur Road, which some still call the Thistlewood Road. Cellar or site not yet found]
50 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $700; value improvements and machines – $19; 1 horse; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 swine; value livestock - $126; 6 bushels beans and peas; 50 bushels Irish potatoes; 20 bushels barley; 12 tons of hay

ANDREW CRACKEN was a 24 year old laborer born in New Brunswick. In his household was John Doughity, a 17-year-old laborer also born in New Brunswick. <nfi>
[Was he living on Lot 49 at the Gihn Place, at the very end of the McArthur Road? This would be about ½ mile beyond where the present road ends. Site not yet found]
20 improved acres; 190 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; 1 horse; 70 bushels oats; 20 bushels barley; 20 bushels buckwheat; 18 tons of hay

GREENWOOD LYONS, a farmer, was born in Belmont, Maine in 1914. His wife Hannah Frost was born in Calais in 1817. Their children, all born in Alexander were Sarah (11), Charlotte (8), Greenwood (7), Almeda (5), Huldah (4) and James (1). Also in the household were Charles and Clarasa Frost, 16 and 15 respectively. Hannah, Charles and Clarasa were children of Jeremiah Jr and Sally Thompson Frost. <Three more children would bless this family, Charles, Lydia and James. Young Greenwood died in 1862.>
[Lot 58; cellar is due east of 117 McArthur Road, just north of newly named Lyons Road]
20 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $300; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 swine; value livestock - $100

NEWELL PIKE was a Maine born blacksmith and 36 years old. His wife Joanna (Sullivan) was 28. Their children were Mary (11), Sarah Jane (7), Chandler (5), Nancy (2), and Francis, Newell and Joanna were married on April 15, 1838 in Calais and several of their children were born there. <They left Alexander sometime after September 1853.> One source gives his name as Sewell.
[A house site existed near where the old Thistlewood swings west; there was a building there in 1929; Ross and Eva (McArthur) Sadler lived there when first married. Did Pike live there?]
10 improved acres; 25 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; value of livestock - $100;

SIMON HARRINGTON FROST was a 29-year-old farmer. He and his 24-year-old wife Mary Ann (Perkins) were the parents of three children, Caroline (5), Elisha P. (2) and Manly E. (8/12). Living with them were William (37) and Elisha (26), Perkins, both laborers and both brothers of Mary Ann. Simon had been born on January 19, 1821 in Calais to Jeremiah, Jr. and Sally (Thompson) Frost. Mary, born on April 13, 1826 at Grand Lake NB, was the daughter of Elisha and Margaret (Farris) Perkins. <Eight more children would be born to this family and they moved to Princeton after 1860.>
[Lot 58; 95 McArthur Road; the place where Ben McArthur now resides]
20 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; value improvements and machines – $30; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 1 swine; value livestock - $100; 110 bushels oats;
8 bushels beans and peas; 6 tons of hay; value of animals slaughtered $30.

~ Asuph turns east on the Blacks Road, now called the Airline ~

VARIAN CRAFTS was a 49-year-old farmer. In his home was his 42 year old wife Jane and children Mary (17), Samuel (15), Alonzo (12), Melissa (7), Frederic (5), Sarah (3) and Thomas (5/12). Varian was born in Hebron, Maine and lived in Waterborough NB where his wife Jane (Ferris) was born. They were in Alexander by July 1830, probably arriving with his brother Isaac. <Varian and his family moved to Princeton before 1860>
[Probably Lot 59, 1283 Airline Road, where Clinton Flood lived and where Lord’s Old Farm Museum now stands]
45 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $1000; value improvements and machines – $50; 3 horses; 4 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 15 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $195; 30 bushels wheat; 25 bushels oats; 30 pounds wool; 3 bushels beans and peas; 80 bushels Irish potatoes; 30 bushels buckwheat; 300 pounds butter; 18 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $22; value of animals slaughtered $60

ASA LIBBY was 56 and a farmer. His wife Sarah (Caldwell) Gray was 52. In the house resided their children Oliver (26), Abner (19), Alice (22) and Amanda (16). Also in the home were Sarah’s daughter Cordilia (Gray) Berry (34) and her children Amelia (7), Albion (3) and Asa (1). Cordilia’s husband Samuel was a mason and likely was working in Calais or St Stephen. Asa Libby was born in Scarborough, Maine, but arrived in Alexander from St. David Parish NB likely in 1832. Sarah Caldwell was born in St Stephen. <At the Alexander Cemetery we find marked graves for Asa, Sarah and other family members.>
[Lot 61 – 989 Airline Road, presently home of Gary Howland]
130 improved acres; 130 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $2000;value improvements and machines – $50; 3 horses; 4 milch cows; 6 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 22 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $595; 40 pounds wool; 90 bushels Irish potatoes; 15 bushels barley; 250 pounds butter;
18 tons of hay;

RICHARD HUBBARD LIBBY was 29. Living in his house was Sarah B. Libby aged 39. Richard was the first child of Asa and Sarah (Caldwell – Gray) Libby, born in New Brunswick. Sarah B. Stanchfield was born in Maine and she and Richard filed intentions of marriage on April 18, 1847. <Richard and Sarah disappear from the Alexander records after 1850.>
[Was he across the road from his father on lot 61, south of Airline where John Grey later lived?]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; 2 milch cows; value livestock - $30;

~ Asuph reached the Baileyville town line and turned north on the Robb Hill Road, also called the Town Line Road, the Loverin District Road or the Alf Perkins Road ~

JOEL CHANDLER was a 53-year-old farmer. His wife Eliza Stackpole was 46. He was born in Freeport and she in Durham, Maine. Their children were Nancy (20), Eliza (17), Mary (14), Harriot (8) and George (14). The children were born in Berlin, Maine which is north of Weld (Twp 6 AP). <This family disappeared sometime after the 1850 census.
[South 40 acres of lot 44 – Robb Hill Road, cellar not found]
40 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 15 sheep; value livestock - $120; 30 pounds wool; 95 bushels Irish potatoes; 300 pounds butter; 15 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $50

JONATHAN HUNNEWELL was a 47-year-old laborer who was born in Durham, Maine. His wife, Susannah (Hall) was born in St Stephen. They lived in St. Stephen where Jonathan worked at a shipyard, until about 1838 when they moved to Alexander. Living with them in 1850 were children Rebecca (19), Andrew (17), Mary (15), Calvin (13), Cynthia (11), David (8), Diantha (6), Caroline (3) and Benjamin (1). <Another son, Charles, was born in 1852, just 3 days after brother Benjamin died. Jonathan and family would soon move to lot 37, 246 South Princeton Road, where his family lived until recently. Brothers David and Calvin died in the Civil War. Jonathan and Susannah are buried in the Alexander Cemetery.>
[likely Lot 35 – Robb Hill Road, later occupied by Edmund Bailey and his son James. Cellar, well and apple trees still evident]
30 improved acres; 120 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $350; value improvements and machines – $40; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $125; 20 bushels oats;

HUGH ROBB aged 45 and a laborer and his wife Ann, 41, were the parents of two sons, Hugh (18) a laborer and Thomas (14). The family was from Ireland and arrived in Alexander after 1840. <Hugh and Ann disappeared before 1860 but their boys were at the same site. Hugh never owned the farm, but his sons later acquired it and they continued living there for many years>
[Lot 25 – at the end of the Robb Hill Road, west of the Baileyville line; the cellar, just west of road way, is filled-in]
30 improved acres; 120 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $250; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $100;

JOSEPH LOVERING was a 50-year-old farmer born in Massachusetts. His 44 year old wife Harriet (Brooks was born in Jonesboro. Their children were Abigail (22), Harriet (18), Abner who went by the name Gardner (16), Sarah (14), Mary (12), Joanna (10), Frederic (8), Elbridge (6), William (4), Emma (2) and Stephen (5/12), The family lived in Calais before 1830. <Joseph, Harriet and two of their children are buried in marked graves at the Alexander Cemetery.>
[Joseph’s farm was on lot 53 – cellar south of 176 Robb Hill Road where Karen Herrick lives]
40 improved acres; 110 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $1000; 1 horse; 7 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 2 other cattle; 14 sheep; value livestock - $250; 40 bushels oats; 45 pounds wool; 50 bushels Irish potatoes; 300 pounds butter; 20 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $ 40; value of
animals slaughtered $70.

ADAM AVERILL was 56,a laborer and born in Maine. His wife Sally was 47 and their children were Sewell (21), Sarah (18), Lavina (15), David (14), Marinda (10) and Eliza Jane (7). They arrived in Alexander after 1840.
[Lot 44; west of Robb Hill Road, cellar south of gravel road from cemetery pits]
20 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $150; He had 1 milch cow worth $15.

~ Asuph returned to the Blacks Road and went west to Asa Libby’s. From there he went south on a road found on one old map to the end of the publicly maintained Nellie Berry Road. This road has been used for forest products removal by owner land Carleton Brown ~

EPHRAIM SCOTT was a 40-year-old laborer. His wife Ann (Bagley) was 39 and also from Baileyville. Their children were Isaac Titcomb (15), Ephraim (12), Elizabeth (9), Elmira (7), Abbe (5), Minerva (3) and Manly (1). The family came from Baileyville to Alexander after 1840. < Ephraim never owned land in Alexander, was he in Calais in 1869?>
[Likely lot 72 and the site where Samuel Berry would soon move, the cellar is on the west side of the road]
10 improved acres; 30 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $250; 1 milch cow worth $15

EBENEZER BROWN, 31 and born in New Brunswick, was a farmer. Living with him were two children, Mary (5) and Edward (2). <This family disappeared from Alexander before 1860>
[Likely lot 72, on the road mentioned above at a rumored house site not yet found]
30 improved acres; 130 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; 1 milch cow; 1 other cattle;
value livestock - $80

ABIEL ABBOTT was a 55-year-old farmer born in Massachusetts. His wife Eunice Townsend had died in 1846. Their children were Olive (25), Manly (24), Abiel (21), Thomas (16), Edward (15), Eugene (12), Asa (8) and John (3). <nfi>
[south half lot 127; top of hill on Nellie Berry Road, probably same site as Nellie Berry at 107 Nellie Berry Road, just south of road, cellar filled-in]
50 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; value livestock - $80; 20 tons of hay

JAMES DYER KNIGHT, a 43-year-old farmer, was born in Calais. His wife Susan (41) was born at Vinal Haven. Susan Brown had married a Hodgdon and had two children of that name. She and James Knight married at Calais on April 8, 1832. Their children on the census were Emeline (15), Susan (13), Sabrina (10), Levi (7), and Annie (2/12). Also living in the home were Eleanor Pike (18) and Alonzo Pike (6/12). Eleanor Pike was the oldest child of James and Susan. The family came from Calais to Alexander before 1840. <It appears that this family moved to Topsfield.>
[Probably on north part of lot 127, off the Nellie Berry Road, near the same unnamed road on which Ephraim Scott and Ebenezer Brown resided, cellar by big oak tree]
25 improved acres; 125 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500; value improvements and machines – $30; 2 milch cows worth $30

~ Asuph traveled west on the Nellie Berry Road to the Flat Road, then south ~

NATHANIEL SAWTELL TOWNSEND (43) was a farmer from Sidney. His wife Emeline Crowell was 38. Their children were Ann (16), Sabra (7) and Mary (2). Living with them was 11 year-old Irish born O’Brien McCarty. <The family came to Alexander after 1840 and departed before 1860.>
[Lot 125; 290 Flat Road, foundation stones scattered about, end of public road, Charlie Holmes last to live near site]
30 improved acres; 220 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen;
3 other cattle; value livestock - $150; 50 bushels Irish potatoes; 200 pounds butter; 200 pounds of cheese, 15 tons of hay; value of animals slaughtered - $15

~ Asuph returns north, then heads west on the Spearin Road ~

JEREMIAH SPEARIN was a 48-year-old Maine born farmer. His wife was Rhoda Bailey (44) born in Baileyville. Their children living with them were Nathaniel (18), a laborer, Louisa (16), John (14), Jefferson (11), Leonard (8), Susanna (5) and Leander (2). Also son William (23) was at home with his wife Abigail Lyon (21) and daughter Emma (8/12). < Abigail and Emma both died before 1852. Jeremiah and Rhoda’s sons Jeremiah, Jr, Leonard and Jefferson all served in the Civil War. Jeremiah and Rhoda died in 1878 and 1879 respectively.>
[Lot 82; 187 Spearin Road, foundation remains west of Warren Morse’s driveway]
28 improved acres; 80 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $1000; value improvements and machines – $10; 1 horse; 5 milch cows; 3 working oxen; 2 other cattle; 14 sheep; 2 swine; value livestock - $300; 30 bushels Indian corn; 50 bushels oats; 60 pounds wool; 100 bushels Irish potatoes;
450 pounds butter; 15 tons of hay; value animals slaughtered. - $100

MICHAEL BROWN was a 42-year-old cabinet maker from England. His wife was Rebecca Knight (41) from Calais. Their children were Robert Clark (21), William (19), Joel (17), Francis Westbrook (15), Elvira (9), Melinda (7), Adkins (5), Martha Emily (3) and Fred Leander (2). Robert was born in Calais, but the other children were born in Alexander. <This family continued to live in Alexander. Adkins was in the Civil War; Fred became a blacksmith and lived at his father's place.>
[Lot 82; north of Spearin Road at end of Fred Brown Lane, Foundation now part of landscape around Doug Scruton’s log cabin at site]
20 improved acres; 40 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $650; value improvements and machines – $20; 1 horse; 1 milch cow; 2 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 1 swine; value livestock - $100;
bushels wheat; 70 bushels Irish potatoes; 9 tons of hay; value of animals slaughtered - $100

EDWARD DAVIS, 54, was a Nova Scotia born farmer. His wife Mary McElroy (53) was also born in Nova Scotia. They arrived in Alexander sometime after 1845. Their children, also born in Nova Scotia, were Ellen (19), Henry (17), Thomas (15), Samuel (12), Gordon (10) and Emeline (5). Five older children were not living in the home. <Edward and Mary and a number of their children lie buried in marked graves at the Alexander Cemetery.>
[Lot 70, cellar on ATV trail between Spearin Road and Airline; the 1929 topographical map shows a road here; Roland Perkins lived there about 75 years ago]
30 improved acres; 130 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; 1 horse; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 8 sheep; 2 swine; value livestock - $200; 40 bushels oats; 20 pounds wool; 50 bushels Irish potatoes; 9 tons of hay

~ Asuph arrives at the Cooper Road ~

ALMEDA TOWNSEND was 38 and the recent widow of Manly Butterfield Townsend. Their children were Abner (17), George (15), Mary (13), Manly (9), Thomas (5), and Phebe (3). Also in the household were Robert Ellis (48), Catherine O’Brien (18), both of Ireland, neighbor Jeremiah Spearin (22), and Albion Keith Parris Townsend (27), a teacher and Manly’s nephew. Manly, the father, was born in Sidney and Almeda was born in Phillipstown, Massachusetts. The family came from Calais to Alexander about 1842. < Almeda stayed on in the big house on Townsend Hill for many years and operated the farm. At Alexander Cemetery we find marked graves for Manly, Almeda and their extended family.>
[Home located on lot 68, 73 Cooper Road where David McClure lives. Almeda owned several other lots around town]
The cash value of the farm was $8000; it had 150 acres improved land and 250 acres of unimproved. The farm implements were worth $125. She had 1 horse, 8 milch cows, 3 pair working oxen, 6 other cattle, 28 sheep that produced 84 pounds of wool, 3 swine, all valued at $500. The cropland yielded 12 bushels of peas and/or beans and 200 bushels of Irish potatoes. The milk churned 300 pounds butter and gave 600 pounds of cheese. The livestock needed 25 tons of hay. Products of animals slaughtered in the past 12 months were valued at $100. The Machias Union reported in 1855 that Mrs. Townsend had nearly 100 acres under cultivation and annually raised 80 tons of hay, potatoes and different kinds of grain.

HIRAM BERRY (44) was a mason born in St. Stephen, NB. His wife was Mary Hitchings Gray (35) of St. David’s Parish. Heir children were Sarah (15), Harriet (12), Mary (10), John (8), Asa (6), Alice (4) and Frances (2). <The baby Francis would die in 1851 and two more children would be born including George Gordon Byron Berry. Hiram and many of his family are buried at The Alexander Cemetery>
[Lot 80; 92 Cooper Road, where Pike Seavey now resides]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; 1 horse; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 16 sheep; value livestock - $160; 35 bushels beans and peas; 300 pounds butter; 12 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $30

WILLIAM SPRING was a 51-year-old farmer born in Thomaston, Maine. His wife was Nancy Aspinwall Brewer (45) of Calais. Their children were Sophia (21), Stephen (17), Nancy (15), Frances (13), George (10), Obidiah (7) and Franklin (3). They came to Alexander from Calais in 1840. In Calais William was a charter member of the Calais Fire Society, the group that had the famous fire buckets. Manly Townsend was another member of that group. <In the 1850s, the following children died, Franklin, Nancy, George, Stephen and Sophia. All are buried in the Calais Burying Ground. William and Nancy continued living in Alexander until after 1870.>
[Lot 80, near 170 Cooper Road, just north of Tommy Long Road intersection]
70 improved acres; 60 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; value improvements and machines – $50; 1 horse; 3 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 2 other cattle; value livestock - $175; 150 pounds butter; 15 tons of hay;

~ Asuph went out what today we call the Tommy Long Road ~

PETER MILLS HAMMOND or Harmon, 52 and a laborer, was born in Dunbarton, New Hampshire. Betsy Woodruff, his 45-year-old wife, was from Machiasport. Their first eight children were born in Machiasport before the family came here between April 1838 and April 1840. Their children were Clarissa (26), Albert (25), James (21), Nancy (19), Sukey (16), Cynthia (14), Lydia (12), Julia (10) and Ambrose (7). <Peter died before 1853 and the family was gone by 1860 except for son James who had married Harriet Lydia Stephenson and they lived at 51 Arm Road, leaving before 1870.>
[East 122 acres of lot 89; one of the cellars beyond end of Tommy Long Road]
30 improved acres; 70 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $600; 1 horse; 2 milch cows; 2 working oxen; value livestock - $100

ISAAC PORTER CRAFTS was 56 and a farmer. His wife Rebecca (Ferris) was 47. Their children were Sarah (17), Priscilla (16), William (10) and Emma (5). Also living in the household was John Mills, aged 40. Isaac was from Hebron, Maine and had lived in Waterborough NB where Rebecca was born. They came to Alexander just before the 1830 census. (Daughter Sarah Louise would die on October 10, 1850. Isaac and Rebecca and four of their children are buried at the Alexander Cemetery.)
[Lot 89; 102 Tommy Long Road where Merle and Ruth Knowles live, probably the same house]
100 improved acres; 180 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $ 2500; value improvements and machines – $40; 3 horses; 5 milch cows; 2 working oxen; 3 other cattle; 14 sheep; 1 swine, value livestock - $300; 60 pounds wool; 70 bushels Irish potatoes; 50 bushels buckwheat; 300 pounds butter;
25 tons of hay; value of animals slaughtered $60. The Machias Union reported in 1855 that Mr. Crafts has nearly 50 acres under cultivation, that he keeps a stock of twenty-five head of cattle, forty sheep, besides swine and poultry.

~ Asuph has returned to the Cooper Road and heads south ~

JOHN PERKINS was born in Mt. Vernon, Maine in 1793 and moved to New Brunswick before coming to Alexander. He and his first wife Marie Williams had the following children: Harriet (20), Lydia (19) and Emma (14). Marie died after childbirth in 1836. Charles Augustus (11) was born on December 31, 1839 and John married neighbor Lucinda Bohanon in June 1840. Their children were William (9), Frederick Stephen (7), Maria (5), Jasper (3) and Adelaide (6/12). <Six children were born after 1850>
[Lots 79 and 80, 150 acres which he had purchased from Samuel Barker in 1833; his home was at 179 Cooper Road where Irene McKain resides; is this the same house?]
John’s farm was worth $1500. He had 46 acres of improved land and 60 acres unimproved. His implements had no value to the census taker. John has 3 milch cows that gave 250 pounds of butter, 2 pair oxen, 3 other cattle and 1 swine all valued at $200. His stock ate 10 tons hay. He grew 100 bushels potatoes and 20 bushels barley. His slaughtered animals were worth $30. John reported 40 pounds of wool in the past year even though he had no sheep at the census time.

JOHN SPEARIN laborer (24) Maria (22) Owen McCarty (11) Remember the name O’Brien McCarty, the 11 year old Irish boy living at the Townsend place. Were these twin brothers or did this child get counted twice? <John was from Massachusetts in one record. In December 1875, John married Mrs. Mary Brownlie of Alexander. John died after the 1900 census.>
[Likely 234 Cooper Road, where John Knowles now resides]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400; 1 milch cow

~ We next find Asuph on the South Princeton Road, then called the County Road ~

JOHN CAMPBELL BOHANON (33) was a farmer likely born in Alexander. His wife was Lucretia (33). Their children were Sylvester (8), Charles (5) and Horace (3). Also in the household was Hannah McKenzie, John’s aunt. <John and his family left Alexander before the 1860 census>
[South part lot 45; near 132 South Princeton Road; John sold this 40 acres with buildings to his brother Jones in July 1850; maybe the often photographed Bohanon house that stood near the road, but also may have been a house sitting back from the road farther, foundation visible from the road]
10 improved acres; 25 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $500

HENRY PAYSON WHITNEY (29) was a teacher from Massachusetts. His wife was Margaret (25) Bohanon of Alexander. They had married on January 20, 1850. <They would have seven children, but two died young. This family moved to Minnesota after 1860.>
[Owned lots 18 & 19, but probably lived on the north part of lot 45 in the home his sister-in-law Amelia Bohanon Brown, widow of Elijah had just moved from; behind Sprague Bars and south of Philip McArthur’s.]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $400

GILES HUTCHINS, born in Maine in 1810, was a laborer. His wife Eliza Bailey (34). Their children were Winslow (10), Elizabeth (8), Louisa (6) and Caroline (1). <Giles died while crossing the Isthmus of Panama in 1852 on his way to the California gold fields. Eliza and her four children plus John born 1852 continued at the same place until after 1860 when they disappear from our records.>
[Lot 46; 151 South Princeton Road, now Keith Prout’s place; was it the same house?]
10 improved acres; 140 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $250

WILLIAM BOHANON was a 34-year-old farmer likely born in Alexander. His wife was Flora Ann Phillips (25). Their children were Louise Ellen (4), Clara Amelia (2) and Henry Edwin (2/12). <Another child, Walter appears on one record and two were born after 1850. This family left Alexander before 1860>
[Possibly lot 46, the north 40 acres; 203 South Princeton Road, where Pedro Ceijas resides]
10 improved acres; 25 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $300

TIMOTHY AHEARN was an Irishmen. On some records his name appears as Hun and Huin. He was a 34-year-old laborer. The woman in his life was 35 year old Nancy Fravern, also Irish. Her last name may well be something else, like maybe Ahearn. Her children were John (8), Hannah (6), William (3) and Margaret (1). The first two were born in Ireland, the next in New Brunswick and the youngest in Maine. <In 1860 and 1870 this family was in Baring with two more children, Catherine and Mary.>
[Maybe lot 37, where Mel Hunnewell lived. Ahearn would soon move to lot 77; west of Old County Road, one of two cellars in the blue berry field belonging to Merle Knowles Jr;]
0 improved acres; 0 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $250

HUGH GRIFFIN was a 36-year-old laborer born in Ireland. Hugh was single, but maybe connected to other Irish in the area. Hugh was in Alexander prior to 1840. <Hugh and Claissa Malarky married in 1855. She had three daughters by a previous marriage; they had two sons. He and Sarah Averill filed intentions to marry in 1870, but they apparently remained unmarried and he was connected to Alexander until his death in the 1890s. >
[Lot 36 – 24 Pokey Road, foundation stones still evident]
20 improved acres; 140 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $450

SAMUEL SEAMANS or Simons or Simmonds was a Maine born farmer and 27 years old. His wife was Abigail Taylor (18) from next door. They had one child, Eliza (2). <Five more children were born to this couple and the family remained in Alexander for several generations.>
[South part lot 9; 709 South Princeton Road where Hubert Noyes now lives]
0 improved acres; 0 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $300

SAMUEL BROWN was a 74-year-old farmer born in either New Hampshire or Machias. His wife Dorcas Libby (63) was from Scarboro, Maine. Their six older children had moved out. Son-in-law James Taylor (43), a laborer, and wife Rachel Brown (34) along with their children Ann (15), Jonathan (13), Caroline (12), Martha (8), Stillman (6), Alden (3) and Abigail (1) all lived with Samuel. Orrington Baker (28) was a laborer living in the home. <The Brown/Taylor family continued living and dying at this site until the turn of the century.>
[North half Lot 9; 739 South Princeton Road, Skip and Jan Poole now live here]
30 improved acres; 50 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $700; 1 horse; 4 milch cows; 4 working oxen; 10 sheep; 1 swine; value livestock - $250; 30 pounds wool; 250 pounds butter; 10 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $12

~ Asuph Sawyer has to go into South Princeton and toward Woodland before finding a road that went south back into Alexander to locate the last family on his census record ~

STEPHEN BILLINGS was a 49-year-old farmer born in North Berwick, Maine. His wife Rhoda Pike of Princeton was 39. Their children were Hiram (12), Joel (10), Lucinda (8), Pamelia (6) and Freeman (4). Rhoda Pike’s first husband was William Bonney who died in 1837. Her Bonney children at home were Asa a 19 year old laborer, Almira (18) and. Ann (15). Edward Jamason, a 15-year-old laborer was living with the family. <Stephen and Rhoda had one more child, Mary Almeda. Son Hiram served the Union during the Civil War. The family continued at this site until after Stephen died in 1868.>
[Lot 10; Billings Road which runs south from Woodland Road in South Princeton, cellar not located]
60 improved acres; 100 unimproved acres; cash value of farm - $800; value improvements and machines – $50; 1 horse; 3 milch cows; 4 working oxen; 4 other cattle; 12 sheep; value livestock - $250; 20 bushels wheat; 20 bushels Indian corn; 50 bushels oats; 30 pounds wool; 100 bushels Irish potatoes; 10 bushels barley; 200 pounds butter; 10 tons of hay; value home manufactures - $30

1852 Three men die in well on Breakneck

1857 Airline Stage Company established


1858 THE LYDIC SET OFF– Prepared by John M. Dudley - 1981

Prior to April 2, 1859 the town line between Alexander and Crawford was straight, and ran North and South. After that date this line had a jag in it, being the Lydick Set Off. The 1861 map does not show this Set Off, but the 1881 map includes it.

One Godfrey Lydick in 1858 occupied a farm in Alexander on the Arm Road. His farm was bounded on the West by the Town of Crawford. Lydick apparently preferred to live in Crawford. His method to accomplish this was not to move to Crawford, but to have his farm set off from Alexander and annexed to Crawford.

In 1858 he files his Petition in the State Legislature. Following is the order that was issued.
“STATE OF MAINE: The Joint Standing Committee on Division of Towns to which was referred the Petition of Godfrey Lydick praying that he may be set off from the Town of Alexander and annexed to the Town of Crawford has had the same under consideration, and asks leave to report that the Petitioner cause an attested copy of this Petition with this order thereon, to be served on the town clerks of the Town of Alexander and Crawford eight days at least before the 5th day of March next that all persons interested, may then appear and show cause, (if any they have) why the prayer should not be granted.” S/ W. J. Sargent Pr Order

The above was “Read and accepted in the Senate on February 18, 1858 and in the House of Representatives on February 19, 1858. A Remonstrance against the Petition was signed by 49 residents of Alexander and duly filed. The Remonstrance reads as follows. The undersigned citizens of Alexander in the County of Washington would respectfully, yet firmly, remonstrate against the Petition of Godfrey Lydick to set off from this town, to Crawford – being granted – Mr. Lydick enjoys all privileges now in relation to schools that he would enjoy, if he should be set off to Crawford – he draws his proportion of the school money, annually, & expends the same in Crawford – and as Proprietors would consent to such a transfer – therefore for the above, and other reasons, we pray that Lydick’s petition may not be granted – and as in duty bound your petitions will ever pray.

“CHAPTER 343 – An act to set off a part of the town of Alexander and annex the same to Crawford. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Legislature assembled, as follows; All that part of the town of Alexander constituting the farm now owned and occupied by Godfrey Lydick is hereby set off from Alexander and annexed to Crawford; and said land is subject to all arrears of taxed heretofore assessed upon it by the town of Alexander. Approved April 2, 1859

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