The material about one room schools was first presented to members of the Alexander – Crawford Historical Society via its newsletter in issues 119 to 130, between November 2003 and August 2006.

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 1

Introductory Comments

In an attempt to put together as complete records of the several single room schools in Alexander as was possible, it was necessary to gather the information from various sources, such as old newspaper clippings, Selectmen's Ledgers, and Annual Town Reports. As a result we are indebted to the late Annaniah Bohanon one of the first eight settlers of Alexander for the account of the first schools in the then Township No. 16. This according to Mr. Bohanon was in the year 1822. He informs us that there was two log school houses built for that purpose, one near Mr. Scribners’ on the Airline, the other on or near Burnt Barn Hill, some where near one half mile west of the Cooper Road and on the road leading from the Cooper Road to Breakneck Hill. Mr. Brastoe taught the school near Scribners'. A Mr. Prince taught the school on Burnt Barn Hill.

The next account we have comes from the Selectmen's Ledger for the year 1849. From then until 1870 the records are fairly complete, as the reader will observe from the following pages. However once again in 1870 the record becomes silent as to who the teachers were or their individual pay. However through the courtesy of Gertrude Strout Winter we have a few brief accounts. They are listed as items one through twelve.

Starting with the year 1893 the records are fairly complete with the exception of the years 1943 and 1944.

Regards to where the several schools were located this compiler had reference to the 1861 and 1881 Washington County Atlas. As to dates when the several schoolhouses were built we have records of only two. The schoolhouse in District No.4 later District No. 3 or Cedar School was built in 1901. Before this building was constructed District No. 4 was for the most part a joint district with Cooper sometimes referred to as North Union School.

The consolidated school was constructed in 1956.

The school building in District No. I it would seem was at its present location at least by the early 1860's. Prior to that the building may have been located across the road from where it now stands.

What we know today as the Alexander Community Club and Fire Department building was in the early days the NorthEast School District School. This building stands on or near the plot of land conveyed by Cornelius Lyon to the NorthEast School District at an early date. It is interesting to note that this conveyance was to the school district rather than to the Town.

The District Three building was in place at least as early as 1849. It was discontinued about the mid or late 1920's. It would seem that this might have been a joint venture with the town of Baileyville as there were families living on both sides of the town line. Nothing was found in the records to tell us that this was the case.

Old District No. 5 School was near the home of Mr. J. Ward on Breakneck prior to 1861. (Reference 1861 Map). Likely it was there much earlier.

Original District No. 6 school sessions were most likely held in some private home within the district or combined with district No. 1, or the Crawford School on the Arm Road, (perhaps all three at different times) until it was abolished in 1881. The school building near "Sears Corner" most likely was built after 1881 and was discontinued before 1920. Stephen E. Frost and Roy Hunnewell bought the building and removed it for their private use

School year 1908-09 had Florence E. Frost as Superintendent of Schools, the only woman in the one hundred-sixty year history of Alexander's schools to hold this position. Miss Frost was a former teacher.

At least three people who taught in the schools here were then or later were ministers of the Gospel, namely Abner S. Townsend, George M. Bailey, and W. P. Greenlaw.

Thomas T. Abbott taught several terms in Alexander schools and later was Sheriff of Somerset County. Mr. Abbott’s name appears frequently in the accounts as a town official of Alexander.

Belcher W. Tyler, another teacher in the Alexander schools, served two terms in the Maine House of Representatives in 1860 and again in 1866. He was also a Justice of the Peace and a town official.

Alice L. Berry taught school in Alexander in the 1860s. She became the wife of John W. Dwelley. Three of their children also taught in Alexander, namely Sadie, Eda and Carrie. At least five grandchildren were to become teachers Muriel, Lillian, Alice, Adla Varnum and Linwood Dwelley. Several great grand children, among them brothers Norman and Harley Dwelley and another was George Dwelley, brother of Rev. Aubrey Dwelley, presently a merchant in East Machias, Me.

 

George B. Berry taught in the schools of Alexander. He also served as Superintendent of Schools. He was Town Treasurer and Post Master several years. Mr. Berry was a brother of Alice L. Berry. His daughter Lula M. was a teacher in the schools here. She married Ernest Perkins and her grandson Vinal Perkins taught in the schools of Alexander and Codyville, he now resides in California. This Compiler was a student of his at the Four Corners in 1926-27. George’s son George Marshall was also a teacher and town official. He is living presently in Portland, Maine.

Miss Adelaide Smyth (Smith) taught School in Alexander in 1856 and again 1857. She became the wife of Solomon 0. Strout, Jr. Their daughter Florence was a teacher in District No. 5 in the spring of 1877. Her granddaughter, Miss. Blanche Seamans was teaching in 1902 and several years there after. She married Ernest Wilson, Veteran of the Spanish American War. Miss Smyth was the Grandmother of Gertrude Strout Winter.

An entry in the Selectmen’s Ledger of July 1, 1903 gives Lewis J. Frost as the teacher District, No. 1. The same Lewis J. Frost is listed in March 16,1908 and March 18, 1911 as Superintendent of Schools. The only time we found two members of the same family that were both schoolteachers and superintendents of schools. Mr. Frost was the third member of the Board of Assessors in 1907 with Gorham P. Flood and William P. Crafts. He was Town Treasurer from 1913-23, and at other times member board of Selectmen, Tax Collector, and Republican Ballot Clerk. His public life spanned a period of more than sixty years, perhaps a record in Alexander.

We acknowledge and greatly appreciate being allowed unlimited access to the Selectmen’s ledgers by the present board Carleton E. Davis, Frederick A. Wallace, and Kenyon Smith.

Pliney E. Frost February 6, 1982

Editor’s comments:

Pliney Eugene Frost (1920 – 1997) spent much of the last two decades of his life researching local history and local families. This paper on schools was a major work and was printed in this newsletter over a period of several years. Pliney used an old typewriter and often reused the ribbons. I can still see him sitting at the kitchen table in the old house, wood stove almost out, typing with two fingers. His was a labor of love. A-CHS project scholar David Chase provided the OCR program and training that allows us to scan Pliney’s work. This program works most of the time, but occasionally the program makes a mess of margins and spacing.

My comments within Pliney’s work will be in Italics. I have given information about the people based on A-CHS files, Vital Records of Alexander, Maine compiled by Sharon Howland, and census records mostly also compiled by Sharon. Most of this consists of year of birth and place of residence. I’d really appreciate information on those marked nfi. Thanks Pliney, David, and Sharon. Pictures and related articles have been added by John Dudley, editor.

 

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 2

Hale School built before 1849, image from ca 1900

 

Schools District #1 (1849 – 1870) Four Corners School

Items taken from Selectmen’s Ledger of Alexander. Editor’s comments in Italics, date in (parenthesis) is for year of birth, nfi means no further information, and * indicates person already described. Many of the descriptions are based on Alexander Vital Records compiled by Sharon Howland. Census records and other A-CHS files were also used.

We can get a picture of how many children were in these schools by looking at the census records. Sharon has typed these so my work was easy. In 1850 Alexander had 544 people of whom 192 were school age. In 1860 our population was 445 and our scholars numbered 148. And by 1870 Alexander was at 456 people with 156 students. As I type this in December 2003, our population is 514 and our school has 85 scholars, a few from Crawford and Cooper. Different districts held school at different times of the year, so children in one part of town might be listed as in "school" and other children not having that designation.

1849 – June 22, Alfred A. Knight; to order for amount paid for schooling children in Crawford - $1.50

June 28, Stephen Billings; to order for amount paid for schooling children in Princeton - $11.84

Sept. 11, James Taylor; to order for amount paid for schooling children in Princeton - $7.40

Sept. 29, Caroline M. Cole to order services as teacher in south part of district - $14.00

Oct. 22, Amanda Tyler, to order services as teacher last summer - $10.00

Alfred Knight (born 1808 at Calais) lived in Alexander from before 1830 to after 1850. Stephen Billings (1802 at North Berwick) married Rhoda (Pike) Bonney, widow of William. Billings lived at the north edge of town, near South Princeton. James Hill Taylor (1807 at Biddeford) married Sam Brown’s daughter Rachel and they also lived near South Princeton. Caroline Moore Cole (1829 St David’s Ridge, NB) was a daughter of William and Eliza Cole and they all lived north of the Airline west of the Huff Road. Mary Amanda Tyler (1828) was a daughter of George and Amelia (Caldwell) and lived north of the Airline near the Crawford line.

1850 - March 29, H. P. Whitney teaching school last winter $52. 00 - Henry Payson Whitney (1820 at Warwick, Massachusetts) married Ananiah Bohanon’s daughter, Margaret. Besides being a teacher, he was a Justice of the Peace and Town Clerk for several years before moving to Minnesota.

1851 - April 7, Abigail Loverin, teaching school $18.00 - Abigail (1830 at Calais) was a daughter of Joseph and Harriet and they lived on the Loverin Road, now called Robb Hill Road.

Sept. 15, Charlotte Huff, teaching school $24.00 - Charlotte (1826 at St. George NB) was a daughter of John and Margaret (Nash) Huff and a sister of Claudius who we will meet later.

1852 - April 12, Amanda M. Tyler, teaching $24.00 - See Mary Amanda above

1853 - Aug. 24, Susan R. Hammons, teaching school $7.00 - no further information = nfi

Dec. 16, Ellen E. (Wade?), teaching school $14.00 - nfi

1855 - March 8, Order in favor H. A. Staples $75.00 - Likely Henry A. Staples (1830) of Baileyville, son of Peter and Sally who lived on the Airline near the Sunset Camp Road.

March 8, Order in favor Phebe Scribner $30.00 - Either widow Phebe (Scott) (1791) Scribner or her daughter Phebe (1823). They lived across from the Cole family on the Airline.

Sept. 28, Order in favor Adelaide Smith $30.00 - Adelaide (1836) was from Milltown and eventually married Solomon Strout, Jr.

1856 - March 20, Order in favor Charles R. Gilman $50.00 - Charles (1834) was from Meddybemps.

Aug. 31, order in favor Miss P. Allen $27.00 - nfi

Dec. 15, Order in favor H. P. Whitney (2) $5.00 each*

 

1857 - Jan. 11, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $6.00*

Jan. 29, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $15.00*

Feb. 7, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $15.00*

March 5, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $15.00*

March 21, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $15.00*

March 28, to order Abner Townsend, teaching? $47.00 - Reverend Abner Sawyer Townsend (1833 at Calais) was the first child of Manley Butterfield and Almeda (Sawyer) Townsend. Her father was Calais builder Abner Sawyer. Manley Townsend lived on the Cooper Road across from the Grange Hall. Abner Townsend lived at the end of the Flat Road.

April 4, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $15.00*

April 11, Order in favor of H. P. Whitney $15.00*

July 10, to order Charles Crosby, teaching? $17.95 - Charles Jourdan Crosby (1807) was a former resident of Baileyville living there on the south side of the Airline on Farrar Hill. He married the widow Margaret (Ward) Mosier and they moved to the Flat Road in Alexander.

August 27, Order in favor Adelaide Smith $36.00*

Sept. 27, to order Anna C. Townsend, teaching? $24.50 - Anna (1834) was a daughter of Nathan and Emeline Townsend. How were they related to Manley?

1858 - Feb. 25, to order Charles R. Gilman $40.00*

Sept. 1, to order, Mary A. Chick, teaching $36. 00 - nfi

1859 - Jan. 31, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching, $ 15.00 + $ 10.00*

March 7, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $15.00*

March 24, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $5.00*

April 9, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $20.00 + $5.00 + $18.30 + $7.00*

1860 - Jan. 24, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $5.50*

Jan. 28, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $9.50 + 15.00*

March 9, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $28.00*

March 17, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $8.25*

April 4, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $10.00 + 7.75*

Aug. 30, to order Amelia S. Bonney, teaching $24.00 - Amelia (1837) was a daughter of James and Jane Bonney of South Princeton.

1861 - April 1, to order Abner S. Townsend, teaching $50,00 + $5.10 + $17.40*

Sept. 16, to order Mary S. Herald, teaching $24.00 - nfi

1862 - Feb. 14, to order Henry P. Whitney, teaching and boarding $29.00*

March 22, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $15.00 + $7.50 + $6.50*

April 17, to order H. P. Whitney, teaching $4.00 + $5.00 + $21.00*

Oct. 11, to order Sarah D, Collins, teaching $6.00 + $6.00 + $12.00 - nfi

1863 - Jan. 24, B. W. Tyler, teaching $2.10 + $5.00 + $21.00 - Belcher (1815) was a son of George and Amelia and a brother of Mary Amanda listed above. See introduction for more on Belcher.
March 16, B. W. Tyler, teaching $8.30- 48.00*
Sept. 4, Addie A. Strout teaching $45.00 - nfi

 

 Four Corners School built about 1864, image likely about 1958.

 

1864 - Feb. 12, H. P. Whitney, teaching $34.00*
March 8, H. P. Whitney, teaching $25.00*

March 26, H. P. Whitney, teaching $18.00*
Sept. 10, Emma Tracy teaching $27.00 - Emeline (1848) was from Baileyville.

1865 - Feb. 3, Thomas B. Townsend, teaching $38.00 - Thomas (1845) was a son of Manley Townsend.

March 11, Thomas B. Townsend, teaching $38.00*

Aug. 30, Emma Tyler, teaching $30.00 – Was this Elma Tyler? See Aug. 31, 1867.

1866 - April 4, Otis W. Gardner, teaching $78.00 – Was he from Charlotte?

Aug. 29, Eliza E, Strout, teaching $30.00 - Eliza (1845) was a daughter of Benjamin and Esther (Bailey) Strout. They lived on the Airline at the corner of the McArthur Road and he had the Post House or Stage Stop for the Airline Stage.

1867 - March 16, Ellen S. Ayer, teaching $52.00 - nfi

March 16, Abner S. Townsend, teaching $16.00*

Aug. 14, Eliza Godfrey, teaching $27.00 - Eliza (1842) was a daughter of Joseph and Rachel (Morrisee) Godfrey. They lived near the Crawford line on the Crawford Road, later on the Arm Road near the Huff family. Eliza died on June 22, 1868 and is buried at the Alexander Cemetery.

Aug. 31, E. A. Preston, teaching $36.00 - Elma Ann Tyler (1825), a daughter of George and Amelia, married Charles H. Preston in 1854. Was she now widowed?

1868 - Aug. 15, Rebecca Godfrey, teaching $24.00 - Rebecca (1850) was a sister of Eliza.

Aug. 26, Rachael Russell, teaching $30.75 - nfi

1869 - March 25, J. A. Lamb, teaching $105.00 - nfi

Aug. 24, Carrie Lamb, teaching $36.00 - nfi

1870 - Jan. 26, J. A. L. Rich, teaching $85.50 - Joshua A. L. Rich (1840) was a son of Daniel and Sarah of East Ridge, Cooper.

Keeping School near South Princeton

Several families lived at the north end of Alexander, near South Princeton. Children from these families usually went to the South Princeton School. See Special Issue #4, "Record of the First School District in the Town of Princeton" published in March 1988 by A-CHS. Here is what was found in the Alexander Selectmen’s Ledger on the subject.

1856 - Sept. 3, Julia F. Smith, teaching school Taylor and Billings district $27.00 - nfi

1857 -Aug. 14, Julia F. Smith, teaching school Taylor and Billings district $27.00 - nfi

1849 - May 28, Miss Nancy Chandler, to order teaching school at Hunnewell $10.25 – nfi on Nancy Chandler. Hunnewells’ would be near the intersection of the Pokey Rd. and the South Princeton Rd. Jonathan Hunnewell plus other families lived here.

Dec. 25, H. P. Whitney, to order for teaching school in Princeton in which Billings and Taylor school money is expended $19.39*

1850 - Sept. 21, Miss Nancy Chandler, teaching school at Hunnewell $5.18

1851 - Dec. 6, H. P. Whitney, teaching school in Princeton $12.00 + $14.00*

1852 - April 4, H. P. Whitney, teaching school in Princeton $17.00*

1853 - Amanda M. Tyler, teaching school in Princeton $16.25 *

Dec. 22, Stephen Springer, order Princeton for teaching $26.80 - nfi

1863 - Feb. 4, William C. Andrews, teaching Seamans, Taylor and Billings $12.75 - nfi

Mar. 21, Henry A. Sprague, teaching Seamans, Taylor and Billings $12.17 - Henry (1835) was a son of Eli and Sarah Sprague of Princeton. (The above appears to be part of District No.1. P. E. F.)

 

School District #2 (1849 – 1870)

Located at the corner of Cooper and Spearin Roads. Also known as Lower District, Townsend School, NorthEast School District, and Hale School. Building stands in 2003, as a garage owned by Roger Holst. (Items taken from Selectmen’s Ledger of Alexander)

1849 - Sept, 21, Miss, Amanda Todd, to order for teaching school last summer $24.00 - nfi

1850 - March 29, A. K. P. Townsend, to order of teaching school in the winter l849 -50 $87.50 - Born in 1829, was he a brother or cousin of Manley B. Townsend?

Aug. 31, Harriet Loverin, to order for teaching school $25.00 – Another daughter of Joseph and Harriet Loverin.

1851 - Sept. 15, Emily J. Anderson, to order for teaching school $25.50 - Emily (1830) was a daughter of William and Sarah Anderson of Baileyville. The family, including her brother Harris lived on the Houlton Road (Route One) near the intersection of the Kellyland Road.

 

1852 - Feb. 21, H. P. Whitney, to order for teaching school $16.50*
March 7, H. P. Whitney, to order for teaching school $42.36*
April 26, Albert H. Staples, to order for teaching school $40.00 - Albert (1822) was a son of Peter and Sally Staples of Baileyville, a brother of Harry.
July 26, H. P. Whitney, to order for teaching school (1851) $8.61*
June 3, William Perkins, services as teacher $15.00 - According to the 1850 census, William was born in 1813 and was single. He was living in Simon Frost’s house. I believe he was the fifth child of Elisha SR. and Margaret (Ferris) Perkins.

1853 - March 28, Thomas T. Abbott, services as teacher $70.00 - Tom (1833 - 1893) married Mary E. Townsend. Tom and two of their daughters are buried in the Alexander cemetery. What about Mary?
Sept. 10, Emily J. Anderson, services as teacher (1852?) $25.50*
April 4, H. P. Whitney, services as teacher (1851) $16.61*

 

1854 - Jan. 16, Jan. 17, Feb. 24, and Mar. 28, Order to H. P. Whitney, services as teacher $109.63*
Oct. 16, Vesta A. Wilson, services as teacher $48.00 - nfi

1855 - March 7, five orders in favor of J. Bugbee $81.00 - nfi

 

1856 - March 26, Henry A. Whitney, order $68.75*
June 30, two orders in favor of P. Spearin Jr. $15.00 each - nfi
Oct. 28, two orders in favor of Mrs. A. S. Townsend $32,00 - Harriet Louise (Berry) Townsend (1838), daughter of Hiram and Mary (Gray) Berry married Abner S. Townsend in October 1854.

 

1857 - Feb. 5, Miss Sarah Mulligan, Teaching $48.00 - nfi

March, 26, Stephen Spring, five orders, $71.50 - Stephen (1833) and Sophia (1829) were children of William and Nancy Spring. They lived on the Cooper Road near the Tommy Long Road.
June 21, Sophia Spring, one order $21.00*
July 1, Sophia Spring, one order $9.00*
July 25, Sophia Spring, four orders $30.00*

1858 - Jan. 2, four orders, A. S. Townsend $13.00 + $10.00 + $7.00 = $5.00*
Feb. 10, two orders, A. S. Townsend $25.50 + $9.50*
March 12, four orders, A. S. Townsend $10.00 + $10.00 + $10.00 + $5.00*

Sept. 13, Mary Dyer, services as teacher $36.00 - nfi

1859 - March 19, Isaac Spencer, services as teacher $60.00 - Isaac (1834) was the son of John and Sally (Bonney) Spencer
July 27, Mary Dyer, services as teacher $12.00 + $13.50 - nfi
Aug. 31, Mary Dyer, services as teacher $10.50

 

1860 - Jan. 28, A, S. Townsend, services as teacher $3.00 + $10.00 + $47.00*
March 17, A, S. Townsend, services as teacher $60.50*
Sept. 7, Mary J. Lowe, three orders teaching $10.00 each - nfi

1861 - March 21, Thomas T. Abbott, teaching school $90.00*
July 24, Laura M. Townsend, teaching school $12.00 - nfi
Oct. 21, Hattie F. Haley teaching school $18.00 - nfi

1862 - March 27, Thomas T. Abbot, teaching school, four (orders) 50.00, $21.75, $11.74, $6.51*

Sept. 16, Almira Huntley, teaching school $27.00 - nfi

1863 - Feb. 23, Abner S. Townsend, teaching school $16.60*
March 28, Abner S. Townsend, teaching school $ 67.40*

Aug. 25, Mary H. Dyer, teaching school $36.00*

 

1864 - March 24, Mark Palmer, teaching school $ 65.00 - nfi
Aug. 28, Miss E. A. Trott, teaching school $28,50 - nfi

1865 - March 3, E. A. Hanson, teaching school $84.31 - nfi
Aug. 7, Alice L. Berry, teaching school $25.00 - Alice (1846), daughter of Hiram and Mary (Hitchings) Berry would marry John W. Dwelley.

1866 - Feb. 23, W. M. Abbose, teaching school $85.00 - nfi
Aug. 13, Lorana Spearin, teaching school and board $45.00 - Lorana (1843) was a daughter of Jeremiah and Rhoda Spearin and lived on the Spearin Road near the Flat Road.

 

1867 - March 9, Otis W. Gardiner, teaching school $82.50 - nfi
Aug. 12, Emmie W. Huff, teaching school $40.00 - Emmie (1849) was a daughter of John and Caroline Huff. John had died in 1850 and Caroline had married Benjamin Strout. In 1867, Emmie would be living in the Strout home at the corner of the Airline and McArthur Roads. Maybe a school article is not the place for this detail, but it does tell about the multiple family ties that existed at this point in history, and it tells about the uncertainity of life, and the need of widows to find a husband to look after them and their children. Caroline Elizabeth Scribner, daughter of Samuel and Phebe (Scott) Scribner married Isaiah W Foster in 1837. They had two children and he died. She married John Huff in 1843 and they had two children before he died. She married B. A. Strout before 1854, and by him bore four children, including one named for his first wife.

 

1868 - March 3, J. A. L. Rich, teaching school $120.00*
Aug. 22, Fannie Colwell, teaching school $30,00 – Likely Fannie (1848) Caldwell of South Princeton, a daughter of William and Dorcas.

 

1869 - Jan. 28, J. A. L. Rich, teaching school $40.00*
March 1, J. A. L. Rich, teaching school $80.00*
July 26, Mary E. Foster, teaching school $35.00 - Marion Emeline (Dunn) Foster (1843) was the wife of I. T. Foster. Isaiah (1840 - 1879)(see next entry) was a son of Isaiah W. and Caroline (Scribner) Foster. Isaiah and Mary lived in Great Pond and Orrington.


Sept. 8, I. T. Foster, wife teaching and repair school house $30.45 - This is one time when the husband is recorded as having collected the pay for the wife’s work. This practice was common from the time of the Civil War until after WWI. Of course, it was unusual for a married woman to be teaching.

 

1870 - Feb. 17, P. A. Rich, teaching school $100.00 - Peter (1836) of East Ridge in Cooper was another son of Daniel and Sarah Rich.

School District #3 (1849 - 1869)

Located on the Robb Hill Road near the Baileyville town line, known as the Loverin District or Baileyville District

1849 - Sept, 10, Abigail Loverin, to order Teaching School past summer $21.00*

1850 - Aug, 27, Abigail Loverin, to order Teaching School past summer $24.00*

1852- Sept. 11, Arzelia Wadsworth to order Teaching School past summer $12.00 - nfi

 

1854 – July 10, an order in favor Charles Crosby, $17.95*

Sept. 27, an order in favor Anna C. Townsend $24.50 *

Nov. 1, an order in favor Sophia Spring, $32.00 *

1855 - March 8, an order in favor H. A. Staples $75.00 *

March 8, an order in favor Mrs. Phebe Scribner, $30.00 - This would be widow Phebe (1791) (Scott) Scribner whose husband Samuel died in 1830.

May 24, an order in favor Isabella Phillips, $ 10.00 Isabella (1805) (Kennedy) Phillips was like the widow of John S. Phillips who died in the well on Breakneck on August 10, 1852.

Sept, 30, three orders in favor of Jane Ross, $12.00 each - nfi

Nov. 1, order in favor of Sophia Spring, $32.89 *

1856 - May 3, order in favor of H. P. Whitney, $22.00 *

Oct. 4, order in favor of H. P. Whitney, Service as teacher $12.00 *

Oct 24, order in favor of H. P. Whitney, $12.00 *

Oct. 31, order in favor of H. P. Whitney, $12.00 *

1857 - July 21, order in favor of Abby W. Stanchfield $16.00 - Abby may be Amanda T. Libby (1834) who married Charles Stanchfield in 1855. The Libby family lived on the Airline near the Loverin District.

1858 - Nov. 22, Nancy Allen, to services teaching, $15.00 - nfi

1859 - Sept. 14, Nancy Allen, to services teaching, $19.00 *

1860 - July 2, Mary M. Moors, to services teaching, $18.00 - nfi

1862 - July 12, Lovina Bean, to services teaching, $16.00 - Lovina was from Topsfield and in 1866 she married Frederick Loverin.

1863 - July 23, Emma L. Strout, to services teaching, $10.50 - Emma (1842) was a daughter of Benjamin and Esther (Bailey) Strout. Emma had a stepsister Emma Huff (1849).

1864 - Sept. 12, Amanda Porter, to services teaching, $10.00 - nfi

1866 - July 12, Alice L. Berry, to services teaching, $16.00 *

1869 - July 26, Emma Tracy, to services teaching, $15.00 - This likely is Emeline (1849) of Baileyville, daughter of Christopher and Elizabeth.

 

School Districts #4 and #5 (1849 – 1867)

Located on Breakneck and North Union,

1849 - June 4, Elma A. Tyler to order for teaching school at John K. Damon, $9.00 *

Nov. 26, Elma A. Tyler to order for teaching present fall $6.00 *

1850 - Jan. 15, John Gooch to order Schooling Chr. District #2 $5.00 - John, son of Ebenezer and Betsey (Avery) lived at the top of Gooch Hill. Was he chairman of the district?

1851 – March 5, Daniel Rich, teaching in Cooper where J. K. Damon money is expended $10.39 -Daniel (1833) was another son of Daniel and Sarah Rich of East Ridge, Cooper. John K. and Elizabeth (Gooch) Damon had lived in Cooper, next to the Alexander line. They wanted to live in Alexander, so in 1838 convinced the Legislature to set-off their farm from Cooper to Alexander.

1852 - Nov. 20, Abigail M. Andersen to order teaching school $14,00 - nfi

1854 - May 24, To order to Isabella Phillips, $10.00 *

June 7, to order Emeline Spring, $10.00 - Likely Nancy Emeline (1835)a daughter of William and Nancy Spring of the Cooper Road.

1857 - Sept. 7, to order Helen Foster, teaching school $10.00 - Helen married Oliver H. Libby in 1858.

Nov. 5, to order E. A. Lawrence, for teaching school $14.25 - nfi

Henry Perkins approved, (North Union District) - Henry (1815) was a son of Solomon. He married Ann Hall and they had a large family. I’ve found no record where in town they lived.

1861 - Nov. 26, Mary A. Bonney, teaching school $16.25 - Mary(1842) was a daughter of James and Jane Bonney and a sister of Amelia all of South Princeton.

1862 - July 19, Mary A. Bonney, teaching school $9.00 *

Nov. 11, Alice L. Berry, teaching school $13.50 *

1863 - Dec. 8, Alice L. Berry, teaching school $12.38 *

1865 - Oct. 12, Emma L. Strout, teaching school $24.00 *

 

1867 - Aug. 14, Alice Dwelley, teaching school $10.00 - Alice was Alice Berry, now the wife of John W. Dwelley and they lived at the foot of Dwelleys or Pleasant Lake.

Oct. 31, Ella A. Huff, teaching school $20.00 - Would this be one of twins born on Christmas day of 1849 to Claudius and Ann (Lane) Huff? They were Amanda E. and Amelia E.

Dec. 17, Warren McGeorge, use of House $8.00 - Warren McGeorge (1839) and his wife Elisabeth (1841) left New Brunswick about 1865 and appear in the Cooper census only in 1870. Their listed children were Robert (1860), Amanda (1862), William (1864), Carrie (1866), and Peter (1868). McGeorge was paid for use of a room where scholars, including his own, were taught. Was this on Breakneck or in the North Union area? They later bought a place on West Ridge, north side. There were two McGeorge families that resided in Alexander, but not listed on any census. They were headed by William (1817) and by David (1825).

 

School District #6 (1850 - 1858)

Located on the Arm Road (now called the Crawford Road) at an intersection called Crockett, or Davis, or Sears Corner. Also known as Andrew Little District, and District #5

 

1850 - Oct. 7, Charlotte M. Huff, to order teaching school past summer $26.00 - Charlotte Milliken Huff (1826) was a daughter of John and Margaret (Nash) Huff and a sister of Claudius. The family reportedly once lived on Breakneck, but by this time had moved the house down the hill to its present site on the Huff Road, off the Arm Road.

Oct. 7, C. M. Huff, to order board of Teacher $8.00

Oct. 7, C. M. Huff, to order board of Teacher $5.00 - Claudius M. Huff was born in 1818 at St George, New Brunswick and lived at the home described above.

Oct. 7, to order Ephraim Brown, use School room, $3.00 - Ephraim (1811), son of Samuel and Dorcas (Libby) Brown married twice. First was Phebe Farrar and next was Nancy Cottell. They apparently lived on the south side of the Airline near the Crawford line. What did this $3.00 represent?

 

1851 - Aug. 23, to order Margaret E. Polleys, teaching school $20.00 - nfi


1852 - Feb. 2, to order C. M. Huff, board of Teacher $10.00 *

Note: It would appear (part of) District # 6 was combined with District #1 at this time (P. E. F.)

1858 - May 3, To order in favor H. P. Whitney for services teaching Lydicks, Godfreys and H. Fenlason children in Crawford $15.00 * - Census indicates only 8 school children in 1858 from those families.

May 15 to order H. P. Whitney for same $5.20 *

May 15 to order H. P. Whitney for same $4.80 *

July 21, to order H. P. Whitney for same $32.03 *

Note: On April 1, 1882 School District #6 was abolished and united with # 5 and designated as #5.

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 3

The details about Alexander schools that we found between 1847 and 1870 is missing. Pliney turned to another source of historic information, newspapers. He would thank Gertrude Strout Winter who had collected these clippings. We added a couple of quotes from A-CHS member L. Austin Gray. jd

ITEM 1: Machias Union, April 11, 1876 ~ The winter school at the Four Corners closed with an exhibition consisting of tableaux, recitations, declamations, and dialogues, etc. Hope, the Guardian Angel, Going To Bed, the Sleeping Beauty, Goddess of Liberty, Courting in the Kitchen, and Light of Other Days were some of the tableaux that were personated by the Misses Huff, Miss Florence Strout, and other young ladies belonging in the District. The parts were well sustained throughout and the performance gave general satisfaction to a large and appreciative audience They all did so well it would be invidious to discriminate not withstanding the inclemency of the weather the house was crowded. In the midst of the performance we were saluted with several volleys of Heavens loud artillery, the flashes of lightening were frequent and vivid and the thunder rolled deep, the snow was falling fast and the wind N. E. Mr. Stone of Baring, who taught the school at the four corners the last winter, deserves and receives much credit for his faithfulness as a teacher, and the success attending his efforts in getting up the exhibition.

Florence Strout (1861) was a daughter of Solomon, Jr. and Adelaide (Smythe) Strout and lived with them on the northeast corner of the Four Corners in Alexander. The Misses Huff were daughters of Claudius Huff. Evelyn (1850) was a daughter by first wife Ann (Lane), and Mary (1863) a daughter by second wife Lydia (Perkins). They lived at the corner of the Arm Road and the Huff Road.

ITEM: Calais Advertiser, February 21, 1877 ~ We have but two schools in operation this winter, one is the Four Corners School or District 1, taught by Mr. John M. Stone, Esq.….. Mr. Stone lives in Baring. And taught this school last winter. A Lyceum under the management of Mr. Stone is in successful operation and is held on Wednesday evening…. The school in District 2 is taught by P. A. Rich of Charlotte, who is a veteran in the business. Each school publishes a newspaper; the one at the Four Corners is named the High School Dispatch and the other the High School Advocate….

ITEM 2: Machias Union, July 17, 1877 ~ July 12th. Schools have closed for the summer vacation. In district No. I., it was taught by Lizzie. Stone, and in No. 2 by Miss Towers, both from Baring. No. 5 by Florence Strout of this town and No. 6 by Josie Godfrey of Alexander. They have all given good satisfaction.

Miss Towers was Almira E. Towers (1852). She and Willis Strout were married November 9, 1878 at St. Stephen. Josie Godfrey (1858) was a daughter of Joseph and Rachel (Morrisee) Godfrey. They lived on the Arm Road, southwest of the Huff home.

ITEM 3: Machias Union, 1878 ~ Our schools are having their usual summer vacation. We had but 3 schools in operation this summer. The school in District I was taught by Miss Bates of Princeton, No. 2 by Miss Anne Gardiner of Charlotte, and No. 3 by Miss Burke. Miss Burke is a young beginner, the others are experienced teachers and all are giving evidence of ability as teachers.

Miss Bates in Princeton was Emma F. (1860), daughter of John and Mary. Annie Gardiner (1855) likely was the daughter of Isaac and Ann. At one time there was a location in Charlotte called Gardeners’ Ridge. One map shows Gardner School and I. J. Gardiner’s house about across from the present Charlotte School. I suspect that was part of Gardner Ridge. See ITEM #6 for Miss Burke.

ITEM 4: Machias Union, February 25, 1879 ~ Our schools are progressing nicely. A Lyceum was instituted here at the Commencement of the winter. Schools under the management of H. C. Townsend and Mr. Gray, which was well attended.

For H. C. Townsend, see in ITEM #7 below. Mr. Gray would be Leander Austin Gray (1859) of Wesley, grandfather of A-CHS member of the same name who supplied two items for this article.

ITEM 5: Machias Union, August 6, 1879 ~ There is but one Sabbath school in operation in town this summer under the efficient management of Simeon Bailey.

Simeon (1830) Bailey was a son of Samuel and Jane (Frost) Bailey. His wife was Sarah Berry Simeon and Sarah lived on Spring Hill on the west side of the Cooper Road. Sarah was a sister of George Berry who we will meet later. Another in her family was Alice who married John W. Dwelley. John and Alice’s son Hiram Delmont lived with Simeon and Sarah.

ITEM 6: Machias Union, June 21, 1880 ~ We have four schools in operation in this town at the present time taught by the following named persons; District No. I, Miss Mary Burke of Robbinston; No. 2, Miss Amy Gardiner of Charlotte, No. 3 Miss Munson of Baring, No. 5 Miss Effie Lydic of Crawford.

Amy Gardiner (1857) likely was a daughter of Amos and Louisa (Jackman) Gardiner. She may have been a cousin of Annie and probably the both called Gardiner Ridge their home. Effie Lydic (1859) was a daughter of John and Ellen (Tupper) Lydick and lived on the south side of the Arm Road, in the Lydick Set-off Crawford. She was a granddaughter of Godfrey Lydic; he was living with her family in 1880.

ITEM 7: Machias Union, January 25, 1881 ~ There are but two winter schools in operation in town this winter, in district I by Harry Townsend of Fort Fairfield, district No. 2 by George. B. Berry, Post Master of the town. Both schools progressing satisfactorily.

H. C. Townsend may well be Harry Townsend. The only Harry that we could find in our records is Harry Porter Townsend who was born in 1867, son of Dr. George and Phoebe (Crafts) Townsend, and grandson of Manley Butterfield and Almeda (Sawyer) Townsend. I doubt that it was he teaching at age 12. Can anyone help? George Gordon Byron Berry (1851), son of Hiram and Mary Hitchins (Gray), by this time was married to Rhoda Stephenson and living at the corner of Cooper and Spearin Roads

ITEM 8: Machias Union, April 12, 1881 ~ Two terms of school are in progress, one at Four Corners Taught by Harry Townsend and in district 1 (likely district No. 2. PEF) by Austin Gray of Wesley.

ITEM from Austin Gray: Machias Union, May 15, 1883 ~ By the law of the last legislature, the legal school week is now five days instead of five and one half days as formerly. Teachers will take notice.

ITEM from Austin Gray: Machias Union, November 20, 1883 ~ ALEXANDER NEWS: Only two schools are in session, in district No. 3 by Mr. Wormwood of Crawford, and by Miss Damon of Charlotte in No. 5. The Sabbath School the past season has been very successful under the management of Simeon Bailey.

Daniel L. Wormwood (1864) was a son of Daniel F. and Harriet Wormwood. They lived north of the Arm Road about half way between the Alexander line and the Airline.

ITEM 9: Machias Union, April 2, 1889 ~ Fremont Stephenson is down to Meddybemps teaching. He is inside of a schoolhouse most of the time and is quite a successful teacher. Stillman Little is teaching school in district No. 5.

John (1857) Charles Fremont Stephenson was a son of Jesse, Jr. and Sabrina (Knight) Stephenson. History buffs will recall that John Charles Fremont was an American explorer of the west. Fremont Stephenson married Mary Huff (ITEM #1) and their daughter Belle married Leo Malloy and lived at the top of Malloy Hill on the Airline Road in Baileyville (Issue #119). Stillman Little (1872) was a son of Andrew and Nancy (Ames) Little. They lived on the north side of the Arm Road, about half a mile east of the Crawford line. Stillman was named for his father’s brother, but the elder Stillman was not in Alexander after he married Jane McGeorge in 1863. One report states that our teacher Stillman became a doctor and died after 1942.

ITEM 10: Machias Union, October 13, 1891 ~ Only two schools are in session in town at present, Miss Florence Frost teaches at the Four Corners, Harry Stuart of Charlotte teaches at the Lower District.

Florence Frost (1866) was a daughter of Thomas Bean Frost and Emeline (Davis) Frost. They lived on the Airline at the foot of Lanes Hill. Florence was a friend of Ida McPheters whose diary is being printed in this newsletter. Harry W. Stewart was born in Meddybemps in 1857, son of Charles and Eliza. He was married by 1880 and shortly thereafter moved to Charlotte.

ITEM 11: Machias Union ~ The winter term of school at the Four Corners is taught by Fred Bates of Princeton. Harry Stuart of Charlotte teaches in the Townsend schoolhouse.

Fred A. Bates (1862) was a brother of Emma Bates in ITEM #3. The Townsend Schoolhouse is another term for District #2.

ITEM 12: Machias Union, May 24, 1892 ~ Miss Grace McClellan is teaching at the Four Corners; Florence Frost in district No. 2 and Ida McPheters in district No.5.

Grace McLellan (1871) was of South Princeton and the daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Bonney) McLellan. Their home was on the northeast corner of the intersection. Grace not only found a job at the Four Corners in Alexander, she found a husband! Grace and Stephen Smith Strout married and later lived in Baring in a big house between Route one and the St. Croix River, near the Calais line. Stephen Strout was a brother of Florence who we met in ITEM #1. Grace and Stephen were the parents of Gertrude Strout Winter, who provided these news clippings to Pliney. It is the connections of people and events, past and present, that make the study of history so interesting. We met Florence Frost in ITEM #10. Ida McPheters is the author of the 1890 diary found elsewhere in this newsletter. She lived with her mother a little west and across the road from the Four Corners School.

 

ALEXANDER SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 4

The Selectmen’s Ledger starting in 1893 has detailed information about teachers including where they taught and their pay. We have added to Pliney’s work what we know about each person mentioned in the ledgers. Each person is described only the first time the name appears in this article. Our sources have been A-CHS files and census records, mostly the work of Sharon Howland. Additions and corrections to our comments are desired. jd

 

School year 1893 - 94
April 13, George M. Bailey, teaching - $20.00; June 23, Edith J. Gerry - $51.00; Annie M. Hughes, District 1 - $36.00; June 24, Lizzie Blaney - $24.00; July 5, Nettie Fickett - $31.50; Sept. 30, Annie M. Hughes – District 1 - $36.00; Oct. 6, Edith J. Gerry - $51.20; Nov. 1, Lizzie Blaney - $24.00; Mrs. Annie Carter - $12.00; Dec. 18, A. F. Robinson, District 1 - $19.00;

Feb. 2, 1894, J. C. F. Stephenson - $106.00; Feb. 22, A. F. Robinson, teaching District 1 - $95.00

 

George Mcbreene Bailey was born on June 5, 1871; the 1880 census lists him as an adopted son of Isaiah Bailey and his second wife, Mary (Chubbuck). George apparently stayed unmarried, living with Isaiah, and later with his adopted brother Jasper Bailey at the end of the Tommy Long Road. Lizzie Blaney likely was Mary Elizabeth (1872), daughter of Thomas and his second wife Sarah Ann (Robb) Blaney of the Pokey Road. Nettie Fickett (1878) was really Ina Burnetta, daughter of Obed and Jane (Sprague) Fickett of Princeton. She married William Strout of Alexander in 1900, and is listed under Strout in 1901 - 02. Mrs. Annie Carter (1835) was the wife of Thomas Carter. The Carters lived at the end of the Nellie Berry Road. Albert F. Robinson (1871) was of Wesley. His parents were Robert F. and Eliza. Robinsons lived at Colson Field, before Colson in TWP #31. John Charles Fremont Stephenson (1857) was a son of Jesse Jr. and Sabrina (Knight) Stephenson. He married Mary Huff; they lived on the Cooper Road in the Townsend house during the 1890s.

 

School year 1894 - 95
April 5, Fremont Stephenson - $94.00; June 5, Florence Frost, 2 weeks - $12.00; June 19, Sadie Blaney, $24.00; June 29, Edith J. Gerry - $52.00; July 13, Nettie Fickett - $28.00; July 17, Florence Frost, 6 weeks - $36.00; Oct. 31, Alice M. Young, 8 weeks - $36.00; Nov. 13, Sadie Blaney, 9 weeks - $27.00; Dec. 15, Florence Frost, 7 weeks - $42.00;

Jan. 25, 1895, Jos. F. Ryan, 1 week - $10.00; Fremont Stephenson, 7 weeks - $70.00; March 1, Jos. F. Ryan, 11 weeks - $110.00; Fremont Stephenson 4 ½ weeks teaching and board - $54.00

Florence Frost (1866) was a daughter of Thomas Bean Frost and Emeline (Davis) Frost. They lived on the Airline at the foot of Lanes Hill. Florence was a friend of Ida McPheters whose diary is being printed in this newsletter. Sadie or Sarah Blaney (1878) was a sister of Lizzie from Pokey Road.

 

School year 1895 - 96

Sept. 27, Ida McPheters, four weeks and board at #5 - $20.00; Oct. 29, Miss Mary Jones, 8 weeks and fare one way at #2 - $41.25; Nettie Fickett, 8 weeks at #1 0 $32.00; Nov. 25, Sadie Blaney at Baileyville District - $42.00; Nov. 28, Ida E. McPheters, 4 weeks and board at #5 - $20.00;

Feb. 13, 1896, Town of Cooper support North Union School - $12.05; Feb. 21, True Varnum, 12 weeks school and board at #2 - $144.00; March 24, S. D. Little, three months school and board at #1 - $129.00

Ida McPheters (1865) was a daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Bohanon) McPheters. They lived south of the Airline, about across from District #1 schoolhouse). True Varnum (1870) was a son of Civil War veteran Sumner and L’Vesta (Coffin) Varnum. The Varnum family lived on the Airline in the eastern part of town. Stillman David Little (1872) was a son of Andrew and Nancy (Ames) Little. They lived on the north side of the Arm Road, about half a mile east of the Crawford line.

School year 1896 - 97
July 14, Ida E. McPheters, Teacher at #5, ten weeks - $ 50.00; July 16, Cora E. Jones, at #1, twelve weeks - $48.00; July 17, Annie M. Hughes, at #2, twelve weeks $54.00; Nov. 14, Eda M. Dwelley, at #3 and #5, ten weeks $35.00; Nov. 16, Sadie Blaney, at #5, twelve weeks $50.00, Dec. 21, Town of Cooper support of North Union School - $31.95;

Feb. 15, 1897, Harry S. Brown, Teacher and board at #1 - $95.00; True Varnum, teacher and board

at #2 - $120.00

 

Cora E. Jones (1878) of Princeton was a daughter of Albert and Alice. She later would marry Charles McLellan of South Princeton. Eda Mayvill Dwelley (1879) was a daughter of John W. and Alice (Berry) Dwelley. This family lived at the foot of Dwelleys Lake (Pleasant Lake). Harry S. Brown (1875) was a son of Robert Clark Brown and Amelia Addie (Berry) Brown. This Brown family lived on the Airline about across from Alexander Elementary School.

 

School year 1897 - 98

June 25, L. Ada Sullivan, Teacher District #2 - $28.00; Carrie M. Dwelley, at #5 - $24.00; June 29, Lena L. Dinsmore, at #1 - $28.00; Dec. 6, Town of Cooper, North Union - $30.50;

Jan. 11, 1898. Carrie M. Dwelley, Teacher at #3 and #5 - $36.00; Jan. 27, Town of Princeton, support of school o $42.00; Feb. 25, True Varnum, Teacher District #2, 3 ¾ months - $150.00; D. W. Palmeter, at #1, 3 ¾ months $112.50; From Contingent Account March 7, 1898, George B. Berry, Supt. of Schools $ 25.00

Mary Caroline "Carrie" Dwelley (1882) was another daughter of John and Alice Dwelley. George Gordon Byron Berry (1851), son of Hiram and Mary Hitchins (Gray) Berry, by this time was married to Rhoda Stephenson and living at the corner of Cooper and Spearin Roads.

 

School year 1898 - 99
June 28, To order Carrie Dwelley, Teacher District #3 - $13.00; July 1, May Creamer at #1 - $35.00; Sadie Blaney at #2 - $33.60; Sept. 28, Carrie Dwelley, teacher and board at #3 - $19.00; Oct.7, Sadie Blaney, at District #2 $14.00, Oct. 25, W. P. Greenlaw, North Union support - $30.00; Nov. 15, Mabel Conick, teaching District #1 - $33.95; Nov. 17, Sadie Blaney, at #2 - $21.00;

March 3, 1899, To order J, W. Edgerly, Princeton School $18.00; March 20, W. P. Greenlaw, teacher, 3 3/4 months District #2 - $142.50; Ralph R. Doten, 3 ¾ months at #1 - $123.75; Feb. 27, To order favor W. P. Greenlaw, Supt. of Schools - $30.00 (Contingent Account)

 

May or Mae Creamer (1879) of Cooper moved to Baring and married Merton Lane. Her parents were William and Jane Creamer. Mabel Connick (1877) was a daughter of Samuel and Harriet Connick of Cooper. Ralph R. Doten (1880) was also from Cooper the son of William and Estella. Joseph Willard Edgerly (1866), was a son of Joseph Whitney Edgerly and Mariah (Sprague) of New Jerusalem (West Princeton). Old Joseph (1822) was known as "Whispering Joe" and his son went by Willard. In the 1900 census, Willard is listed as a civil engineer.

 

School year 1899 – 1900

June 6, To order favor S. D. Little, Teaching School District #3 – $68.60; June 30, Florence R. Fitch at #1 - $33.75; Maude McGlaughlin, at #2 - $29.25; July 10, S. D. Little, balance at #3 - $1.40; July 22, " Sadie L. Dwelley at #3 eleven weeks - $35.75; Nov. 11, Maude McGlaughlin at School District #2 - $35.00; Dec. 2, May Creamer at #1 - $35.00; May Day 13 weeks - $42.25;

Jan. 29, 1900, To order Ralph R. Doten, Teaching School one month - $38.00; Feb. 23, W. P. Greenlaw at, North Union - Cooper tuition - $25.00; March 21, W. P. Greenlaw teaching school 4 months at District #1 - $140.00; Ralph R. Doten at #2 for 2 ¾ months - $104.50

Florence Fitch (1871) was a daughter of Coburn and Laura Fitch of Princeton.

 

School year 1900 - 01

June 15, to order Nettie Strout teaching including board at #1 - $9.50; July 2, Jeannette Vickery teaching at #2 - $ 35.00; July 3, Eda M. Varnum teaching and board at #3 - $45.00; Harry S. Brown, teaching and board at #1 - $39.00; Nov 9, May E. Creamer at #2 - $35.00; Dec. 24, Gertrude McLellan, at #1 - $35.00; Nov. 28, Eda M. Varnum at #3 - $57.00;

Feb. 21, 1901, favor H. I. Smith, at #1 $96.00; Mar. 8, H. S. Brown at #2 $133.00; H. S. Brown, Supt. of schools - $25.00

 

Jeanette Vickery was from Calais; she married Lee Berry in 1906. Gertrude McLellan (1879) of South Princeton was a daughter of Jacob and Nancy. They lived at the Four Corners. Eda M. Varnum was born Eda Mayvill Dwelley (1879). She and True Varnum were married on March 22, 1898 and were renting the Godfrey place on the Arm Road.

 

School year 1901-02
June 24, Town of Princeton Tuition - $50.00; June 29, Alice E. Pike, Teacher Dist. #1 - $35.00; July 1, Mrs. Louise C. Frost, Teacher diet. # 2 - $50.00; Sept. 14, Sadie L. Dwelley #3 - $45.00; Nov. 2, Anna Greenlaw, #1 - $35.00; Nov. 4, Lottie Miller, #2 - $35.00; Dec. 16, S. L. Dwelley, #4 - $63.00
Jan. 9, 1902: E. M. Varnum, # - $45.00; Jan. 21, F. A. Bates, #2 - $105.00; Jan. 22, H. S. Brown, #1 - $120.00; H. S. Brown, superintendent of schools - $20.00

 

Alice Pike was from Princeton; she would marry Cleveland Day in 1909. Mrs. Louise Frost (1861) was the wife of Stephen D. Frost, Jr. She was Louise Lane of Baring. Sarah Louise "Sadie" Dwelley (1867) was the oldest child of John Willard and Alice Libby (Berry) Dwelley. Fred A Bates (1862), son of John and Mary from Princeton is listed in census records as a schoolteacher.

 

Quite a number of names defied our attempt at identification. We found three women named Mary Day in Wesley, but no hint which, if any, was a teacher. We found nothing on Lena Dinsmore (Densmore, Dunsmore), Edith Gerry (Geary), Annie M Hughes, Maude McGlaughlin (McLaughlin), Lottie or Charlotte Miller, Ada Sullivan, or Alice M. Young. Anna and W. P. Greenlaw should have been from Princeton, but weren’t in our sources. Joseph F. Ryan is a Baileyville name, but we didn’t find him. There was a Harry Smith (1874) in Princeton who may have been H. I. of 1900-01.

 

We checked census records for Alexander, Baileyville, Cooper, Crawford, Meddybemps, Princeton, and Wesley. Can anyone help identify these teachers?

in account with treasurer of the School Fund

 

At some point after incorporation, the people of Alexander sold the public lots and loaned the money at six- percent interest to various individuals. A notebook in our files gives the following.

January 20, 1902 –Greenwood Lyons note for $19.70* – paid November 29, 1911

May 11, 1902 – Alice S. Dwelley note for $220.00 – paid November 25, 1914

June 28, 1902 – Greenwood Lyons note for $86.25* – paid November 29, 1911

September 1, 1902 – Charles S. Hunnewell note for $50.00** – paid September 1, 1914

January 12 1903 – Jones A. Bohanon note for $ 165.00 – unpaid in 1929

April 3, 1903 – Stephen D. Frost & Morton Scribner note for $50.00 – paid April 3, 1909

April 18, 1903 - Morton Scribner note for $131.58*** – paid March 17, 1911

May 7, 1903 – Levi Henderson note for $210.00 – paid May 29, 1907

November 1, 1908 – Alexander Grange note for $600.00**** – paid August 2, 1913

*Greenwood Lyons assumed and paid off notes owed by William Spring and John Cottle, maybe receiving property in exchange. ** Charles Hunnewell had divorced his first wife and in 1899 married Ida McPheters. This money may have been used to buy the old store building and build onto it for a house at the Four Corners. ***This was a "Strout note". Mort Scribner acquired the Benjamin Strout place on the Airline. **** In May 1908 the Grange acquired land from Charles Brown on which to build its hall.

Cedar School in 2005 picture. It is now a private home

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 5

School year 1901-02 School House Account District # 4

This is Cedar School, 580 Cooper Road, home today of Norman and Donna (McArthur) Brown

Mar. 27 Raised to build School House - $250.00;

Transferred from school to School House Account - $1.62
May 3, 0. W. Dwelley, labor & sills on S. H.- $32.10

May 6, Ivan Tuell, blacksmith work for S. H. - $1.60
June 17, Alvin Carlow, labor S. H. # 4 - $7.80

Harry Frost, Hauling lumber school house District # 4 - $16.00
June 20, Robert McArthur, labor on school house District # 4 - $4.85
June 24, Lincoln Flood, labor on school house District # 4 - $4.50
J. Murchie & Sons lumber for school house District # 4 - $1.48
St.Croix Planing Mill, lumber for school house District # 4 - $6.30
June 26, Alvin Carlow, labor on school house District # 4 - $4.50
June 29, 0. H. Dwelley, labor on school house District # 4 - $33.86

H. Dwelley, labor on school house District # 4 - $14.36

H. Dwelley, labor on school house District # 4 - $26.98

J. W. Dwelley, labor and material on school house #4 - $9.50

Aug. 5, Everett Spearin, hauling Brick for school house #4 - $4.00

Sept. 14, O. W. Dwelley, school house #4 - $25.00

O. W. Dwelley, school house #4 - $41.00

Albion Carlow, school house #4 - $6.00

L. Stephenson, school house #4 - $2.00

Oct. 15, Chase Barker & Co., Hardware, for school house #4 – $16.01

Oct. 18, A. H. Perkins, Hauling, hauling for school house #4 - $7.00

Orren Hunnewell, Hauling, hauling for school house #4 - $12.00
C. H. Wyman, Seats for school house #4 - $27.45

S. D. Frost, Items, see bill, for school house #4 – 16.00

Todd Bros. $ 4.50
H. A. Brooks 10.65
S. S. Pineo, .85

Nov. 5, Bromo Kalish, Brick for school house #4 - $4.50
Dec. 12, 0. H. Dwelley, Labor, on school house #4 - $10.12

Dec. 24, C. L. Brown, Nails etc. for school house #4 - $3.28
1902

Mar. 28, C. Tyler, 1/4 round, for school house #4 - $1.35.
Oct. 9, Chase Barker and Co., Hardware, for school house #4 - $27.29
Dec. 22, The Caxton Co. Blackboard, for school house #4 - $10.50
1903

March 23, H. F. Eaton & Sons, Lumber, for school house #4 - $156.04

March 24, F. Murchie & Sons, Lumber, for school house #4 - $1.50

Total $534.87

Zephaniah Builds A Schoolhouse – Among Other Things

Compiled by Ben & Natalie Butler and Donald McKeen

Published 1975 by the Little Red Schoolhouse Museum, Farmington

Book review prepared by John Dudley

This wonderful book is valuable to the local historian in several ways. First it has the diary, or daybook as Zephaniah called it, for the year 1854. That is pre Civil War and 36 years earlier than any diary we at A-CHS have. Secondly, the reader must understand that the activities described in this diary are much the same activities that were happening all over rural Maine. Only the place names and the people names are different.

Secondly, and of importance to readers of this series about Alexander schools, the diary tells about building a schoolhouse. Building a schoolhouse was not town business, but school district business. As yet we have seen no records from any of the six Alexander School Districts. We are extremely fortunate to have the "Record of the First School District in the Town Of Princeton" which was printed in 1998 as A-CHS Special Issue #4. Member Rachel (Brown) Hamilton allowed us to use the original records.

Zephaniah Vaughan (1811 - 1882) lived in New Vineyard, near Farmington. Here are a few entries from his diary to give a picture of how he built the New Vineyard Village School. His spelling has not been changed. Comments by book reviewer are in Italics.

January

12 - Drafting a chool house for the District

21 - Sold the Chool House to be built and I bid it to myself to build for $400

23 - In the afternon went to the villedge to look for lumber

24 - In the forenoon went to look for timber and in the afternoon saw a cancer taken out of Miss Wilder’s brest.

25 – In the woods cutting timber for school house and had good luck. It was cold. For the next three days he cut and hauled timber. E. Hackett helped him.

31 - Preparing trimmings for the school house and made trade with L. Voter to make the doors and sash and blinds.

February

1 - Went to Strong to by clapboards for the school house and paid $14.50 for 1200 hundred

2 - Turned six sets cartwheels for L. Voter and one set table legs for myself.

9 - Sawing hard wood lumber for the school house, and paid $6 dollars for the logs.

13 - Went to Strong hand hawled 1200 clapboards with one yoke oxen

17 - Planed clapboards for school house. Before the month was over Zephaniah spent seven more days planing clapboards.

March

4 - Worked on the mill saw and cut all teeth for Z. Sweet

13 - Went to town meeting. Was chosen one of the selectmen of the town

18 - Disposed of the poor of the town

22 - This day found myself at my old table trying to help make the school house tax and at three o’clock clered up the tax on the highways and schoolhouse.

27 - Worked hard breaking road to mill and the wind would fill in the track as fast as we could make it and it was cold enough to freeze anyone.

April

22 - This day found myself at my old table trying to help make the school house tax and at three o’clock clered up the tax on the highways and schoolhouse.

May

2 - Hewed timber for the school house and finished on the 5th.

6 - In the forenoon went to Leander Daggett’s to ingage timber for the school house

9 - This forenoon worked for John Stewart on mill dam, in the afternoon plowed some.

15 - I went to shingle mill and helped W. Vaughan on shingle stuff til supper time. Zephanaih spent three more days "hawling seder" and working at the shingle mill

29 - Helped D. Vaughan make stone tools.

30 - Split stone for school house and had good luck. D. Vaughan helped. They were four more days splitting stone.

June

5 - Fitting the stone for underpinning for the school house. D. Vaughan helped

6 Worked on the foundation for S. House. D. Vaughan worked for me.

7 hawled tthee load of stone for underpinning

8 hawled five load of stone in the forenoon. In the afternoon fixed some tools

9 Set underpinning for the school. D. vaughan helped me.

12 Finished setting stone for underpinning and commenced framing on school house. D. V. helped

13 Framed on school house D Vaughan helped

14 Framed on school house D. Vaughan and L. Voter helped in the after part

17 Worked on the road with my oxen

19Worked hawling lumber and framing on school house. D. Vaughan helped me.

20Hawled lumber from L. Daggett’s mill and framed school house D. Vaughan helped.

21Worked on school house, hawling lumber and framing. D. Vaughan helped me

22 Hewed sleepers and framed some and raised after supper. D, Vaughan helped

23 Worked onnwindow frames for school house. D. Vaughan hrelped me

24 Worked making window frames and other finish for schoolhouse. D. Vaughn helped me. Spent 94 cents for schoolhouse

26 Worked on schoolhouse trimmings with D. Vaughn. Paid L. Voter $13.00 for work on schoolhouse.

27 worked on schoolhouse. D. Vaughan worked. Raised the roof. Borded some.

28 Bought of J. Look one thousand of spruce boards. Worked bording school house. D Vaughan worked

29 Bought of L. Daggett 12 hundred of hemlock bords for 60 cents a hundred. D. Vaughan helped me bord on schoolhouse.

July

1 Spent 10 dollars for nails for school house to J. Stewart

3 Hawled some lumber from L. Daggett’s mill, 505 feet of hemlock bords at 6 dollars a thousand. Borded some in afternoon.

5 In the after part hawled some lumber for schoolhouse

6 planed bords at home for school house

7 Worked putting on trimings on schoolhouse. Daniel Vaughan helped me.

8 Worked on school house. Paid D. Vaughan $24.00

10 Worked on schoolhouse, putting on trimmings and shingles

11 Shingled on school house. George Morton helped.

12 do

13 Helping make money taxes of the town

August

5 This day clered up my haying, had 32 loads and worked 18 days with my little boys.

8 Commenced on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan commenced

9 Worked on schoolhouse laying floors. Warren vaughan helped me some.

10Worked on schoolhouse. Warren Vaughan helped me.

11 Worked on schoolhouse. Clapborded some. Warren Vaughan worked for me.

12 worked on schoolhouse. Warren vaughan helped me.

14 do

15 do

16 do

17 Worked clapbording schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped me. I went to Farmington after supper. Spent $6.25 cents and $2.75 for schoolhouse.

18 Worked on schoolhouse. Warren Vaughan helped me.

19 do

21 do

22 worked on schoolhouse. W vaughan helped me part of theday.

23 worked on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped.

24 do

25 do

26 In the forenoon worked on schoolhouse. Warren vaughan helped.

28 Paid 80 cents for lumber. Worked on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped me.

29 Worked on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped.

30 do

31 do

September

1 Worked on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped.me

2 worked on schoolhouse in afternoon

4 worked on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped

5 do

6 do

7 worked on schoolhouse lathing. W. Vaughan helped.me. This took three days.

14 - Commenced plastering schoolhouse. E Hackett and D. Vaughan helped me. He spent 2 more days plastering. He paid Hackett 21/2 days at 2 shillings for day.

18 - Worked on schoolhouse Commenced setting glass. He got the glass in Farmington and spent nine more days setting glass.

28 Went a-cranberrying. Got 6 qts. To furnel of Mrs. Pratt, and then went after apples to W and got 20 bushels for $2.50 cents

October

2 Worked on schoolhouse. Warren helped me

3 Worked on schoolhouse. W. Vaughan helped me.

4 Worked on adz for schoolhouse

6 Helped Mr. Voter finish the schoolhouse doors.

9Worked on schoolhouse.

10 worked on schoolhouse on benches on hard wood and it was hard work.

11 Worked on schoolhouse on benches. Hard work.

13 Worked on benches for schoolhouse. Paud W. Vaughan $10 dollars and S. Luce $5 dollars – all for the schoolhouse.

14worked on schoolhouse – painting, setting glass and fixing blinds

21 received 67 cents for rye this week and $8.74 cents for butter

23 Worked on schoolhouse painting blinds

24 - Worked on schoolhouse putting up seats. He worked six more days on the seats, commenting, "had good luck", and, "Worked hard on hard wood."

November

3 - Worked making Master’s desk and made it in one day after the legs were made.

6 - Worked on schoolhouse. Finished the woodwork inside. Paid W. Vaughan $2.50 out of schoolhouse money.

7 - Worked on schoolhouse painting inside. It took three more days to complete this job.

13 - Worked on schoolhouse building chimney. He finished the chimney the next day,

15 - Worked on schoolhouse finishing up my job. Paid E. Wright 40 cents for fixings for schoolhouse.

16 - Worked making door step and blackboards. Blackboards were black painted walls.

30 - At home eating roste Beef and felt somewhat thankful for the rich blessings of heaven.

December

9 - Worked on belfrey for schoolhouse.

16 - Worked on Belfrey for the schoolhouse.

30 - Worked on a sled for myself.

borrowed $100 from Thomas Parker pd back

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 6

School year 1902 – 03

To order issued to: June 27, Grace Strout, Teacher dist. #4 - $35.63; Ethel Harmon, #2 - $36.00; June 30, Clara Finley, #1 - $31.50; July 7, Eda M. Varnum, #3 - $42.75; Oct. 31, Grace Strout, #4 - $26.60; Nov. 3, Clara Finley, #1 - $37.50; Nov. 10, Mrs. S. D. Frost, #2 - $60.00; Dec. 19, Blanche Seamans, #4 - $30.00; Dec. 22, Eda M. Varnum, #3 - $61.75

Feb. 9, 1903, F. A. Bates, #2 - $87.50; Feb. 17, Harry S. Brown #1 - $104.00

School year 1903-04
To order issued to: June 26, Theresa M. Carter, Teacher dist. #2 - $37.50; Blanche R. Seamans, #4 - $30.00; June 27, Bertha Fenlason, #3 - $32.50; July I, Lewis J. Frost, #1 - $50.00; Oct. 27, Lewis J. Frost #1 - $40.00; Nov. 13, Harry S. Brown, #2 - $80.00; Nov. 23, Town of Princeton, Tuition - $20.00; Dec. 4, Bertha Fenlason, Teacher #3 - $45.50; Dec. 11, Blanche E. Seamans, #4 - $45.50
Feb. 5, 1904, F. C. Kennedy #1 - $79.20; Feb. 12, Harry S. Brown, #2 - $80.00; Harry S. Brown, Supt. of Schools - $20.00; Town of Baileyville, Tuition - $6.60

 

School year 1904-05
To order issued: June 14, P. D. Brown, Princeton, Tuition - $18.00; July 1, Maude McGlaughlin, Teacher, dist. # 2 - $50.00; Ruth Averill, #3 - $30.00; Blanche E. Seamans, Teacher and board dist. # 1 - $50.00; Aug. 2, Lula M. Berry, Dist. #4 - $27.00; Nov. 7, Blanche E. Seamans, #1 - $52.00; Nov 9, Maude McClaughlin, #2 - $57.50; Dec. 7, Maude Howe, #4 - $49.00
Jan. 23, 1905, Lula M. Berry, Teacher dist. #3 - $42.25; Feb. 9, Ralph Hayward #2 - $90.75; March 2, S. A. Hayward, #1 - $82.5O; March 18, G. B. Berry, School Supt. - $25.00

School year 1905-06

To order issued to: Apr. 17, Mame Stephenson) Tuition - $45.00; June 30, Louis Frost, Teaching Dist. #4 - $28.00; Bessie Spooner, #1 - $33.75; P. B. Brown, Tuition Princeton - $18.00; July 8, True Varnum, Teacher Dist. # 2 - $67.36; Aug. 2, Lula M. Berry, #3 - $29.25; Nov. 10, Bessie Spooner, #1 - $42.50; Bert Conant, #4 - $75.00; Myrtle Ashby #2 - $42.50; Dec. 19, Hattie Redding, #3 - $52.00;
Jan. 8, 1906, Ethel Hayward, #3 - $13.32; Jan. 22, Blanch Howe, #4 - $24.50; Jan. 26, Hattie Redding, #1 - $34.00; Feb 3, True Varnum, #2 - $67.50, March 21, True Varnum, (from Contingent Acct.) Supt. Of Schools) - $25.00 (1905)

 

School year 1906-07

To order issued to: June 13, Miss Edith Crafts, Teaching Dist. #2 - #32.00; June 22, Mrs. Jessie Getchell, #4 - $36.00; June 27, Maggie Blainey, Teaching & board #1 - $54.00; June 28, Hattie Redding, #3 - $42.50; Nov. 6, Maggie Blainey, Teaching & board #1 - $60.00; Nov. 7, Ethel Pollys, #2 - $50.00; Nov. 10, Mrs. Jessie Getchell, #4 - $50.00; Dec. 8, Hattie Redding, #3 - $59.00

Jan. 18, 1907, P. G. Getchell, #1 - $35.00; Jessie Getchell, #4 - $40.00; Bessie Spooner, # 2 $35.00

 

School year 1907-08

To order issued to: Apr. 10, Town of Princeton, Tuition - $53.19; June 28, Etta Crosby, Teaching School Dist. #1 - $32.00; Hattie Redding, Teaching and board - $48.00; Lilia Hume, Teaching School - $40.00; Aug. 17, Maud Crosby, 6 weeks - $21.00; Sept. 3, True Varnum, Supt. of Schools - $12.00; Oct. 19, Maud Crosby, Teaching School 8 weeks - $28.00, Nov. 1, Etta Crosby, teaching school $34.00; Dec. 6, Maud Billings - $65.00; Nov. 12, Etta Crosby - $20.00; Ethel Polleys, #2 - $80.00; Dec. 19. Maud Crosby - $24.00, " "

March 16, 1908, Lewis J. Frost, services as Superintendent of Schools - $13.00

 

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 7

In 1910 Alexander had a population of 374 of which 104 likely attended school. Note here the variety of detail that exists in the record from year to year. Pliney did quite a wonderful job researching all that is here. As before, in Italics, I have added biographical information about the characters. Two new items appear in this article, payments for transporting children and tuition for secondary education. A reminder; District 1 is the Four Corners by the Airline and South Princeton Roads, #2 is Hale School near the Grange Hall, #3 was the Lovering District on the Robb Hill Road, and #4 was Cedar School at the top of Gooch Hill, #5 was the old Breakneck District and #6 was at Sears Corner. For some reason, starting in 1915, teachers from other places were hired. I’ve had a harder time identifying them and would welcome additions and corrections to my work. jd


School year 1911-1912

By Paid: June 4, Mrs. Sandy Leaman, 1 ½ weeks in Dist 5 - $7.50; June 26, Town of Princeton, tuition for Kneeland kids - $26.00; June 30, Clara Dunham in Dist. 3 - $40.00; Hazel Lyon, 10 weeks in Dist 2 - $55.00; Bert Flood, 10 weeks in Dist. 1 - $60.00; Mary Buck, 10 weeks in Dist. 4 - $50.00; July 22, Maud Perkins in Dist. 5 - $35.75; Oct. 20, Ella Kinney, teaching and board in Dist. 4 - $64.00; Bert Flood, 8 weeks in Dist. 1 - $72.00; Hazel Lyon in Dist. 2 - $48.00; Maud Perkins in Dist 5 - $$49.50;

Dec. 21, Eda Varnum, 14 weeks teaching and board in Dist. 3 - $98.00; Ella Kinney, 8 weeks teaching and board in Dist 4 - $64.00; Bert Flood, 8 weeks in Dist 1 - $72.00; Hazel Lyon, 7 weeks in Dist. 2 and 2 weeks in Dist 3 - $45.00; Dec 30, Clara Dunham, 7 weeks in Dist. 5, $21.00

Jan. 22, 1912, Town of Princeton, Tuition for Kneeland kids - $48.00; March 21, True Varnum, Supt. of Schools - $28.00

Mrs. Sandy Leaman was Olive Brownlee born 1886, daughter of Samuel and Ella (Bowles) Brownlee. They lived on the Baileyville side of the Robb Hill Road. Clara Dunham was the daughter of the new Methodist minister in town, Reverend William and Jennie (Davis) Dunham. They lived at the parsonage on the Cooper road. Clara would soon give up teaching and marry widower Delmont Dwelley who lived across the road. Hazel Lyon was from Brookton. She probably was a granddaughter of Porter Lyon, Jr. who was born in Alexander, moved to Brookton, and died there in 1916. Hazel likely stayed with relatives on the McArthur Road, Robert and Alice Leahan. She married Ferdinand Lawler of Princeton in 1915. Bert Flood was born in 1891, the oldest son of Lincoln and Lizzie (Perkins) Flood of the Cooper Road. His daughter, Mildred Holst, told me that Bert skated across Pleasant Lake on his way to and/or from teaching. Mary Buck was from Searsport. Rolfe Flood told me that his father, George Flood, went to school a lot longer than other boys his age. He liked the teacher, and the teacher like him. George and Mary were married in 1916. Ella Kinney came from Lubec. In 1911 she and Bert Flood were married. Eda Varnum (1878) was a daughter of John and Alice (Berry) Dwelley. The Kneeland kids were the children of Moses and Eva Kneeland who lived at the Sam Brown place at the top of Taylor Hill, next to the Princeton town line. True Varnum, son of Civil War Veteran Sumner and Nancy L. Vesta (Coffin) Varnum, was a professional teacher. It is interesting to note that he died just six days after his mother on March 10, 1924.

Cedar School in 1913

Who took this snapshot and why are some students pictured and others looking out the window? The teacher is Ella Kinney Flood and those shown are Geneva Flood, Leonard Bailey, Leta Flood, John Dwelley, Leota Perkins and Jennie Bailey. Ella Kinney had married Bert Flood in December 1911. Geneva and Leta were his sisters. The Baileys were siblings. Leota lived near the school at to top of Gooch Hill in the ghost’s house and John ‘Jack" Dwelley lived at the foot of the hill where the family had a sawmill.

 

School year 1912-1913

By Amount Paid: June 28, Mrs. Bert Flood, teaching and board for 11 weeks - $93.50; Bertha Reynolds, 10 weeks - $50.00; Susan Boyd, 8 weeks - $56.00; Princeton, tuition for Kneeland children - $20.00; Sept. 4, Eda M. Varnum, teaching and board 9 weeks - $54.00; Nov. 22, Bertha Reynolds for 11 weeks - $55.00; Bertha Merrill teaching and board for 11 weeks - $99.00; Gladys Crafts, 10 weeks in Lovering Dist - $40.00; Dec. 21, Eda Varnum teaching and board for 14 weeks - $84.00.

Jan. 3, 1913, Town of Princeton, Tuition of scholars - $38.00; Jan. 9, Bertha Reynolds, 5 weeks - $25.00; Laura Colwell, 15 weeks - $75.00; Jan. 24, Marcia Flood, 8 weeks - $32.00; Bertha Morrill, teaching and board - $63.00; March 21, Town of Princeton, tuition - $12.00; Marcia Flood, 8 weeks - $32.00

Bertha Reynolds (1893) was from Meddybemps. Her parents were Charles and Cora (Murphy), and she married Bert Ward. Gladys Crafts (1896) was a daughter of William and Phebe (Perkins) Crafts. She married Luther Little of Pembroke. Marcia Flood (1897) was a daughter of Lincoln and Lizzie Flood of the Cooper road. She was a younger sister of Bert. Eda Dwelley and True Varnum had married on March 22, 1898. True and Eda were different from their neighbors; they were teachers and not attached to the land. They lived at 311 and 331 Arm Road, 92 and 179 Cooper Road. They

had two children. Muriel (June 21, 1903 – 1994) married Archie Smith, was a teacher, and lived in Springfield VT. Lillian (March 3, 1905 – 1979) was a teacher and a singer. True died on March 10, 1924 in Princeton where he was teaching. Eda died on June 17, 1954. Both are buried at

the Alexander Cemetery.

School year 1913-1914

May 14, Hazel Seavey at Dist 2 - $42.50; Albertis LeGacy, 4 weeks - $30.00, June 13, Albertis LeGacy, 3 weeks in Dist 1 - $22.50; June 27, Marcia R. Flood, 9 weeks teaching and board - $67.50; Eda M. Varnum, 9 weeks teaching and board - $54.00; True Varnum, 9 weeks teaching and board - $112.00; Hazel Seavey, balance 9 weeks teaching - $32,50; Albertis LeGacy 10 weeks - $75.00; July 10, Town of Princeton, Tuition $25.00; G. P. Flood, Supt. of Schools - $13.00; Sept 16, Albertis LeGacy, 1 month - $50.00; Bert Flood, part payment teaching and board - $20.00; Oct. 17, Albertis LeGacy - $50.00; Nov. 20, Bert Flood, teaching and board @ $45.00 month - $70.00; Albertis LeGacy, 4 weeks - $50.00; Dec. 17, Eda Varnum teaching and board - $78.00; Albertis LeGacy, 3 weeks - $37.50; Town of Princeton, tuition Moses Kneeland children - $28.00; G. P. Flood, Supt. of Schools - $12.00; Dec. 24, Marcia Flood teaching and board - $92.00; Lottie Dunn, 17 weeks teaching - $136.00

Jan. 9, 1914, Bert Flood, 9 weeks teaching and board - $101.25; March 2, G. P. Flood, Supt. of Schools - $5.00

Albertis LeGacy (1889) was the son of William and Annie LeGacy of Princeton. He met and married on June 28, 1913 Gladys Hussey of Alexander. She had been the hired girl at the home of Mary Bailey, widow of Civil War soldier Isaiah. Gorham Parsons Flood, son of Wesley and Mary (Burns) Flood, was married to Amy Perkins and living on the Spearin Road. Lottie Dunn was from Pembroke.

School year 1914-1915

Gladys Crafts 9 weeks in Dist. 3 - $27.00; Catherine Richards in Dist 2 - $48.00; Lawrence E. Orcutt, 13 weeks in Dist. 1 - $106.50; Abbie Bragdon, 13 weeks in Dist 4 - $195.00; Marcia Flood, 10 weeks in Lower Dist (#2) $50.00; Albertis LeGacy, 13 weeks at Dist 2 - $244.00; Fred W. Hayford at Dist 1 - $44.00

Jan. 13, 1915, Alice Linton, 16 weeks at Lovering Dist - $80.00; Town of Princeton, Tuition - $36.00; Gorham P. Flood, Supt. of Schools - $30.00

School year 1915-1916

By Paid: June 30, Bert Flood Dist 3 - $88.00; Avis Lancaster, Lovering Dist - $60.00; Annie McDowell, 10 weeks in Dist 1 - $85.00; Nov. 19, Annie McDowell, 11 weeks in Dist. 1 - $93.50; Sidney O. Young, Jr. 21 weeks at Dist. 2 - $189.00; Alice Linton, 28 weeks at Dist 4 - $192.00; A. Grover Wentworth, 18 weeks at Dist 3 - $144.00; Dec 17, Eda Varnum 21 weeks at Dist 3 - $147.00

Feb. 5, 1916, True Varnum, 7 weeks teaching and board at Dist 2 - $91.00; Town of Princeton, tuition for Moses Kneeland children - $74.00; G. P. Flood, Supt. of Schools - $30.00

Annie B. McDowell was from Princeton. She (1892) was a daughter of Mathew and Susan.

School Year 1916-1917

Mrs. E. J. Conley - $187.30; Miss Barbara Davis in Dist 4 - $80.00; Annie McLellan in Dist 3 - $48.00; Marcia Cousins, 11 weeks - $132.00; True Varnum, 12 weeks - $156.00; Millicent McLellan at Dist 3 - $76.00; True Varnum at Dist 2 - $260.00; A. E. Jenkins at Dist 1 - $104.00; Isabel Waite, Baileyville - $199.00; William D Bates at Dist 1 - $156.00; Irene Labbie at Dist 4 - $70.00; Town of Princeton, tuition - $26.00; True Varnum, Supt. of Schools - $12.00; City of Calais, tuition for Hazel Strout - $30.00; Charles H. Swan, Supt. of Schools - $45.48

Annie McLellan (1897) was a daughter of Charles and Cora McLellan of South Princeton. She married Harry Andrews in 1920. Millicent (1898) was her sister. She married George Kinney in 1918. Baileyville likely refers to Dist 3 on Robb Hill Road. Hazel Strout (1902) was the oldest child of William F. and Nettie (Fickett) Strout. She was a granddaughter of Solomon, Jr. and Adelaide. They all lived in Adelaide’s house at the Four Corners. This indicates Hazel was the first from Alexander to go to secondary school at public expense. Hazel married and divorced Cecil Pomeroy. They had one child, Elwood who died in WWII in the Canadian Air Force. Hazel moved to Ottawa where she worked for a major department store and died a fairly wealthy woman. Charles H. Swan (1883) was from Princeton. He was a son of James and Elizabeth Swan.

The Graduating Class of 1917

These nine girls are posed in front of Hale School. It is possible that they all attended this school and were graduating from grade nine. Teacher True Varnum is standing in the doorway. The little girl is neighbor Ethel Scribner. The graduates from left to right (with married manes in parenthesis) are Phyllis Seamans (Peterson), Velma Dwelley (McLeod), Christine Flood (McLellan), Muriel Varnum (Smith), Vivian Dwelley (Holmes), Hattie Frost (Frost), Vesta Varnum (Duffy), Bernice Frost, and Alice Varnum (Williams). Alice loaned this image.

 

School year 1917-1918

Mabel McDowell, Baileyville - $181.00; Mabell McDowell at Dist 4 - $111.00; True Varnum at Dist 2 - $156.00; Nina Hanson at Dist 4 - $132.00; Douglas Bunce at Dist 1 - $104.00; Hazel Prescott at Dist 2 - $242.00; Jinnie Richards at Dist 1 - $148.00; LaNora Buncker at Dist 1 - $135.00; Town of Princeton, tuition at common school - $60.00; Charles H. Swan, supt. of Schools for ½ year - $45.47; City of Calais, tuition for 6 pupils at high school - $120.00; Town of Princeton, tuition for 2 pupils high school - $40.00

Mabell McDowell likely was another daughter of Mathew and Susan from Princeton. In August 1919 she married Everett Perkins of Alexander.

School year 1918-1919

Maurice Richards at Dist 2 - $168.00; LeNora Bunker at Dist 1 - $430.50; Marcia Cousins at Dist 4 - $396.00; Beatrice Hanna at Dist 2 - $210.00; Charles H. Swan, Supt. of Schools - $100.00; Town of Princeton, tuition $120.00; Alfred Perkins, transporting children - $160.00

I can not find where Nora Bunker came from, but she married Bernard Seamans on July 1, 1920. They are buried in the Alexander Cemetery. Marcia Flood married Harold Cousins on August 4, 1915. She was a daughter of Lincoln and Lizzie Flood and taught as a single woman in 1912-13. Alfred Perkins lived on the Robb Hill Road. The town at this time closed District 3 schoolhouse where in 1917 it had paid $181 to educate the children. Now it paid a lesser amount to transport the children to District 2. District 3 schoolhouse will reopen later. The form of transportation used may have been a car, but more likely horse power was used in winter when the roads were not plowed.

 

MAINE SCHOOL REPORT – 1911

The various departments of our state government have published reports to the Legislature. Mildred Holst and Elizabeth McVicar made this report available to A-CHS and the material in it gives a broad view of education in Maine and allows us to compare our small town(s) to the county and the entire state. The ALEXANDER SCHOOLS' article gives specific information about our town.

CHARACTER OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL PROPERTY FOR YEAR ENDING APRIL 1, 1911

Alexander had 4 one-room school buildings, each with a flag, and 3 in good condition. They were valued at $1700.

Baileyville had 5 school buildings, only 2 in good condition, and only one with a flag. One was a rural one-room building and four were graded village schools. One school used a course of study. The value was $1700.

Cooper had 4 one-room school buildings, 3 had flags and were being used. The value was $2000.

Crawford had 2 one-room school buildings, only one with a flag. The value was $3500.

Princeton had 6 school buildings, two with flags. Three of these were one-room rural schools. All schools had libraries. The value was $15000.

Wesley had 4 one-room school buildings, 3 with flags. The value was $2500.

Washington County had 250 school buildings, 187 with flags. 51 schools had libraries. One school had been built within the year; that was the Woodland School Building at a cost of $1600. Value of all school buildings was $288,450.

State of Maine has 3780 school buildings valued at $7,638,057.

TEACHERS HIRED AND THEIR PAY AT COMMON SCHOOLS

Alexander hired 2 male teachers at $47.50 per month and 8 female teachers at $6.60 per week. Teacher pay accounted for 60% of the school budget.

Baileyville hired 8 female teachers at $11.11 per week, which was 87% of the school budget.

Cooper hired 2 male teachers at $35.33 per month and 3 female teachers at $7.50 per week. Teacher pay was 100% of the school budget.

Crawford hired 1 female teacher at $7.00 per week. This was 100% of the school budget.

Princeton hired 4 male teachers at $52.50 per month and 11 female teachers at $9.50 per week. Teacher pay represented 86% of the school budget.

Wesley hired 3 male teachers at $43.00 per month and 2 female teachers at $7.00 per week, which was 100% of the school budget.

Washington County had 72 male teachers averaging $41.96 per month and 420 female teachers averaging $8.40 per week. 80% of school funds in the county were spent on teacher salaries.

State of Maine had 601 male teachers with average monthly pay of $44.43 and 6331 female teachers with average weekly pay of $8.57. Statewide, 82% of school funds were salaries.

LOCAL APPROPRIATIONS AND STATE FUNDS FOR COMMON SCHOOL EDUCATION

At this time towns had to provide not less than 80 cents per resident for the common schools.

Alexander spent $1100 for education in 1910 – 11 and received $830 from the state.

Baileyville spent $2911 of which $2470 came from the state.

Cooper spent $747 and received $416 from the state.

Crawford expended $391 of which $215 came from the state.

Princeton spent $3202, but got only $2172 from the state.

Wesley spent $826 and received $431 from the state.

Washington County towns got from the state $88,899 and spent $109,983.

The State of Maine supplied $1,949,416 of the $2,009,481 spent on education that year.

NUMBER PUPILS IN COMMON SCHOOLS

Alexander had 40 boys and 57 girls in ungraded schools

Baileyville had 8 boys and 6 girls in an ungraded school and 194 pupils in grades 1 through 10.

Cooper had 22 boys and 30 girls in ungraded schools.

Crawford had 8 boys and 18 girls in its ungraded school.

Princeton had 41 boys and 38 girls in ungraded schools and 178 pupils in a graded school.

Wesley had 27 boys and 28 girls in ungraded schools.

In all Washington County there were 1534 boys and 1543 girls in ungraded schools. Jonesport and Milbridge were the only schools with kindergarten. A total of 6178 pupils were enrolled in graded schools in the county.

This Maine School Report has a financial report from the University of Maine and reports on the Normal Schools. Their names were Farmington Norman School, Eastern State Normal School (Castine), Western State Normal School (Gorham), Aroostook State Normal School (Presque Isle), Washington State Normal School (Machias), and Madawaska Training School (Fort Kent).

WSNS opened on September 6, 1910 with 33 pupils in attendance. WSNS used Libby Hall and the Machias High School building during the first semester. On December 25, 1910 the new building (now called Powers Hall) was complete. The second semester started the first Monday of January with 44 students in attendance and with 150 pupils in the model school. These 150 pupils were Machias children whose classrooms were in the west half of Powers Hall. Teachers at WSNS were William L Powers, Principal, Frank Smith, Ella B. Quinn, M. R. Keyes, Annie Putnam, Dora Owen, Alice Black, Martha Toby and Emma Hinckley.

Summer school was available for teachers. From July 10th to the 21st 63 adults enrolled at Machias to learn about School Management, Primary Methods, Arithmetic, Geography, History, Grammar, Vocal Music and Geology.

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney E. Frost

Part 8

The Roaring Twenties were the good times before the Great Depression. Wages for teachers and others went up. Alexander people were using horseless carriages to carry farm products to Woodland or Calais, except during winter and mud season. Alexander’s first published Town Report was printed for the March 15, 1922 meeting.

But for some locals, the grass was greener elsewhere. The population of Alexander continued its fall that started after 1850. In 1920, the census taker found 371 residents. In 1930, that count had dropped to 312.

Be sure to read the companion articles, memories of two schools as described by Marian Cousins, Bert Varnum and Fletcher Perkins. I thank them for their generous sharing of information. I also acknowledge the late Pliney Frost for his work that allows us to print this series. Editorial comments in Italics. jd

School year 1919-1920

Marvel Wentworth in Dist 2 - $224.00; LeNora Bunker in Dist. 1 - $168.00; Verna Wallace in Dist 4 - $143.00; Fannie Towes in Dist 1 - $312.00; Faye Cook in Dist 4 - $130.00; Mrs. Everett Perkins - $40.00; Charles Love in Dist 4 - $144.00; Alfred Perkins for transporting scholars - $88.00.

Nora Bunker came from Franklin to teach in Alexander. She was a daughter of Erastus and Harriet (Wentworth) Bunker. She ended up marrying Bernard Seamans, brother of Blanche who we met earlier. Verna Wallace was from Crawford. Her parents were James and Mildred. She ended up living in Easton, wife of Cecil Fuller. Mrs. Everett Perkins came to Alexander from Princeton as a single woman. She was Mabell McDowell and in August 1919 she married Everett Perkins of Alexander. Charles Love was a boarder, according to the 1920 census, at the home of Alvin and Mary Carlow, across from Cedar School. We met Alfred Perkins earlier. He lived on the Robb Hill Road that was known by some as the Alf Perkins Road.

School year 1920-1921

True Varnum - $1260.00; Arthur Beech, 6 weeks in Dist. 4 - $96.00; Fannie Towes - $170.00, Mrs. Everett Perkins $30.00; Mrs. Sandy Leeman - $134.00; Marvel Wentworth, five weeks - $80.00; Linwood Dwelley - $546.00; Thomas McCullough, 16 weeks - $400.00; Town of Princeton, tuition $90.00; Town of Princeton, high school - $72.00; City of Calais, 3 scholars - $60.00; Alfred Perkins for transporting scholars - $162.00; Charles H. Swan, Supt. of Schools - $152.00

We have met True Varnum (1870), a son of Civil War veteran Sumner and L’Vesta (Coffin) Varnum because he was a professional teacher who often taught in Alexander. Mrs. Sandy Leeman was Olive (Brownlee). By this time she was mother of Grace, Viola, Ruth, and Dorothy. Linwood Dwelley (1899) was from Meddybemps. His parents were Morey and Lillian (Harriman), and he was a grandson of John W. and Alice (Berry) Dwelley of Alexander. Thomas McCullough was from Calais. He was a big man who later worked on the bridge. Many will remember him as being a great storyteller. Charles Swan was from Princeton.

School year 1921-1922

July 5, Mrs. Sandy Leeman for teaching her own child ½ year - $50.00; July 11, True Varnum, 10 weeks - $300.00; July 25, Linwood Dwelley, 10 weeks - $260.00; Sept. 16, Miss Annie Porter for 13 weeks - $260.00; Oct. 26, A. Lewis Clark for 7 days - $25.20; Nov. 10, Faye I. Busheau for 5 weeks $90.00; Dec. 19, Caroline Sprague for 13 weeks $260.00

Feb. 10, 1922, Caroline Sprague for 6 weeks - $120.00; Feb. 24, Elizabeth Palmer for 20 weeks - $360.00; March 14, Alice Varnum for 20 weeks - $240.00; Faye I Busheau, for 11 weeks - $ 198.00

Alice Varnum (born 1900) was a daughter of Earl and Carrie (Dwelley) Varnum. Her family lived on the Airline in the eastern part of town. She married Coburn Williams, and lived and taught in Waite.

School year 1922-1923

Faye L. Busheau - $590.00; Silvie Farnsworth - $180.00; Carolyn Sprague - $200.00; Alice Varnum - $460.00; Avis Whittaker, 2 weeks - $36.00; Wallace Hanscom, 4 weeks - $72.00; J. Woodford Hone, 7 weeks - $140.00; Mrs. H. A. Cousins for 15 weeks, 3 days - $280.80; Dewey Hillman, 9 weeks - $162.00; Town of Princeton, 7/16 cost to maintain South Princeton School - $353.94; Town of Princeton for high school tuition - $60,00; City of Calais, high school tuition - $240,00; Geo. H. Beard, Supt. of schools - $156,56; Earl Varnum, services on school board - $2,50; Ernest Perkins, services on School board - $2.50

Mrs. H. A. Cousins was Marcia (Flood) Cousins. Harold’s wife also taught as a single woman. Earl Varnum, brother of true the teacher, lived on the Airline in the east part of town. It is said that he placed a high value on education. We will meet some of his children later. Ernest Perkins, son of Elisha, Jr. and Rhoda Strout was married to Lula Berry. They lived on the south side of the Airline on Bailey Hill. Their sons were Vinal, Harold, and Russell.

School year 1923-1924

Hazel Swan, 12 weeks - $216.00; Marcia Cousins, 10 weeks - $180.00; Alice Varnum, 10 weeks - $170.00; Faye L. Busheau, 10 weeks - $205.00; Geo. I. Morrison, 20 weeks - $360.00; Millie Stanhope, 20 Weeks - $ 320.00; Ada Mabey, 9 weeks - $144.00; Hugh Chaffee, 17 weeks - $306.00; Pearl Hill, 11 weeks - $165.00; Town of Princeton, Tuition South Princeton School - $278.47; Town of Princeton, tuition at High School - $180.00; Town of Baileyville, tuition at High School - $120.00; City of Calais, tuition at High School - $540.00; Geo. H, Beard, Supt. of Schools - $185.84

Millie Stanhope of Milltown was a daughter of Herbert and Pearl (Styles) Stanhope. Quoting from her 2004 obituary, "after graduation from high school at age sixteen, she taught school in a one room schoolhouse in rural Alexander. She believed her enthusiasm and her appreciation for her 38 pupils in grades 1-8 overcame her lack of skills and the experience instilled in her a lifelong love of teaching." Millie married Gunnar Winckler and after his death in 1975 had a summer place on Pleasant Lake until 1989. Millie was active in the early years of A-CHS.

School year 1924-1925

Millie Stanhope, Dist. 1 - $160.00; Mrs. Nora Seamans, Dist. 1 - $396.00; Josephine Porter, Dist 4 - $180.00; Vinal Perkins, Dist. 4 - $342.00; Pearl Hill, Dist 3 - $150.00; Charlotte Porter, Dist. 3 - $160.00; Mrs. Ernest Perkins, Dist. 3 - $112.00; George Morrison Dist. 2 _ $180.00; Marshall Berry, Dist. 2 - $342.00; F. A. Day, Supt. of Schools - $156.55; Town of Princeton, proportionate part of So. Princeton School - $287.32; Town of Princeton High School tuition - $100.00; Town of Baileyville High School tuition - $180.00; City of Calais High School tuition - $260.00; Earl Varnum, Chair. Term expires 1925; Fay McArthur, Term expires 1926; Ernest Perkins, Term expires 1927.

Nora Seamans was Nora Bunker in 1919-20. Vinal Perkins (1906) was a son of Ernest and Lula (Berry) Perkins. Was it nepotism that Ernest, a school committee member, had his wife and son and brother-in-law all teaching? Or was it because other teachers were not available? Mrs. Ernest Perkins was Lula (Berry), daughter of George B. and Rhoda (Stephenson) Berry. Lula had taught as a single woman. Marshall Berry (1906) was a son George B. Berry and his second wife, Ada (Crafts) Perkins widow of George Perkins. Therefore, Lula Perkins and Marshall Berry had the same father. Fay McArthur, son of Robert and Gertrude Lillie (Perkins), lived on the McArthur (Thistlewood) Road. His daughter Eva Sadler lives in Calais and his grandson Ben lives near the old home site.

School year 1925-1926

Nora Seamans for teaching 30 weeks - $660.00; Vinal Perkins for teaching 11 weeks - $198.00; Marshall Berry for teaching 11 weeks - $198.00; Mazie Brown for teaching 13 weeks - $208.00; Marjorie Dwelley for teaching 18 weeks - $324.00; Marvel Dinsmore for teaching 15 weeks - $270.00; Adla Varnum for teaching 18 weeks - $288.00; Town of Princeton, Alexander’s proportionate part of

South Princeton School, 1924-25 - $236.58; Town of Princeton High School Tuition - $80.00; City of Calais, High school tuition – $180.00; F. A. Day, Supt. - $156.00; Earl Varnum, Chairman school board, term expires 1928, services - $3.00; Fay McArthur, term expires 1926; Ernest Perkins, term expires 1927

Marjorie Dwelley was the third child of Delmont and Eunice (Lane) Dwelley. This family lived across from the Hale school. Marjorie married Bert Eldridge in 1929 and moved to Milbridge. Adla Varnum was another daughter of Earl and Carrie Varnum. She also taught in Waite. Adla, Alice and A-CHS member Bert Varnum were siblings

School year 1926-1927

Nora Seamans, teaching Dist. 1 - $264.00; Marvel Dinsmore, teaching Dist. 4 - $270.00; Adla Varnum, teaching Dist. 3 – $512.00; Marjorie Dwelley, teaching in dist. 2 - $180.00; Eva B. Seavey, teaching in Dist. 4 - $360.00; Joseph Bragdon, teaching in dist. 2 - $ 370.00; Vinal Perkins, teaching in dist.1 - $400.00; Town of Princeton, tuition South Princeton - $209.31; Town of Vanceboro, tuition - $40.00; Town of Baileyville, Tuition - $180.00; F. A. Day, Supt. - $194.67; Earl Varnum - $10.00

School Committee, Earl Varnum, Chairman, term expires 1928; Ernest Perkins, term expires 1927; Fay McArthur, term expires 1929

Eva Seavey (1907) from Crawford was the oldest of Ernest and Gertrude (Roberts) sixteen children. She married Bert Flood and lived in Alexander on the Cooper Road. Eva had four daughters, Mildred (Holst), Louise (Frost), Pauline (DeWald), and Carolyn (Clavette) before an early death.

School year 1927-1928

F. A. Day, Services as Superintendent - $211,04; Vinal Perkins - $200.00; Joseph Bragdon - $200.00;
Eva Seavey - $180.00; Carolyn Dwelley - $340.00; Stephen Tompkins - $380.00; Francis Parlin - $380.00; Adla Varnum - $544.00; Town of Vanceboro, Tuition - $20.00; City of Calais, tuition - $200.00; Town of Baileyville, tuition - $200.00; Earl Varnum, School Committee - $10.00; Faye McArthur, School Committee - $5.00; Ernest Perkins, School Committee - $5.00

School year 1928-1929

Nora Seamans, Dist. 2 - $638.00; Carolyn Dwelley - $260.00; Adla Varnum - $480.00; Stephen Tompkins, Dist. I - $220.00; Bessie Crosby Dist. I - $380.00; Nellie Tuell - $342.00; Secondary Tuition - $717.50; Superintendent Account; F. A. Day, Salary - $199.92; School Committee; Fay McArthur - $l8.50; Lester Craft - $5.00; Herbert Lowe - $5.00

Lester Craft, son of Reuben and Alice (Perkins) Craft, was married to Gladys (Perkins) and lived on the Airline at the top of Lane’s Hill. Herb Lowe, son of John and Esther Lowe, lived on the Green Hill Road. He married Maude Howe and their children were Shirley (1906) and Eula (1917).

Circa 1928 at Hale School

We’ll never know what was coming up the road that was distracting some of these children. In front we have Billy Holst and Buster Holmes. The little boy pointing is Foster Carlow. The row of seven starts with Sidney Perkins followed by Lawrence Frost in his neat ball cap. Next is his brother Darrell Frost followed by Calvin White, Donnie Perkins, Irene Carlow, and Winnie Strout. The back row is a crooked one. On the left we find Fletcher Perkins with brother Ivan Perkins behind. Next are Elden Hunnewell and Rowena White. The little girl in front of Rowena is Irma Perkins and Irene Perkins is behind her. Viola White is looking at the camera whereas Eleanor Frost and Dorothea Craft are looking off to the south. What is the distraction? Hilda Crosby loaned this image and Mildred Holst supplied the names.

We welcome additions and corrections to this work. Those who we failed to add biographical information are Fannie Towes, Arthur Beech, Marvel Wentworth, Annie Porter, Lewis Clark, Faye Busheau, Caroline Sprague, Elizabeth Palmer, Silvie Farnsworth, Avis Whittaker, Wallace Hanscom, Woodford Hone, Dewey Hillman, George Beard, Hazel Swan, George Morrison, Ada Mabey, Hugh Chaffey, Pearl Hill, Josephine Porter, Charlotte Porter from Princeton, F. A. Day, Mazie Brown, Joseph Bragdon, Carolyn Dwelley, Stephen Tompkins, Francis Parlin, and Bessie Crosby.

 

1915 RULES FOR TEACHERS

These rules were recently published in the Gorham (Maine) Historical Society Newsletter. They list the expectations of that community for their female teachers. Likely some of these would also applied to teachers in Alexander.

  1. You will not marry during the term of your contract.
  2. You will not keep company with men.
  3. You must be home between the hours of 8pm and 6am unless attending a school function.
  4. You may not loiter downtown in the ice cream stores.
  5. You may not travel beyond city limits unless you have permission of the Chairman of the Board.
  6. You may not ride in a carriage or automobile with any man unless he is your brother.
  7. You may not smoke cigarettes.
  8. You may not dress in bright colors.
  9. You may under no circumstances dye your hair.
  10. You must wear at least two petticoats.
  11. Your dresses must not be shorter than 2 inches above the ankle.
  12. To keep the school neat and clean, you must sweep the floor at least once daily, scrub the floor once a week with hot soapy water, clean the blackboards once a day and start a fire at 7:00 am so the room will be warm by 8:00.

MEMORIES OF HALE SCHOOL

Marian Dwelley Cousins was the youngest child in her family and they lived across the road from the school. At age four she would tag along with her brothers, Dana, Harvard, and Paul and play with the children before school and at recess time. While the others were inside, she would wait on a rock pile. Storekeeper and neighbor Charlie Brown suggested that Marian should go to school instead of waiting outside. Thus started Marian’s formal education.

 

The building had two doors, the door on the right for girls and the one on the left for the boys. Inside each door was a coatroom. The teacher’s desk was in an alcove between these two rooms. In the classroom were the typical desk/chair sets for two people each, big ones in the back. Also in the front, between the teacher’s desk and the pupils, was a long heater stove that could hold wood three or four feet long. The stovepipe ran all the way to the chimney in the back of the room, allowing for lots of radiant heat. The woodshed was outside, between the schoolhouse and the Spearin Road. On cold days the teacher might make a big pot of cocoa for after recess. The older boys kept the fire and also filled the water jug using ten-quart pails. In the back of the classroom were two doors, each leading to an attached toilet.

Within this one room schoolhouse, most lessons were taught to small groups or individuals. Marian’s first book was The Hen Found a Bag of Flour. Marian learned to read this by rote. She also listened in on other lessons and had finished grades 1 – 9 by the time she was twelve. Her father would not allow her to go to high school in Woodland at such a young age, so she repeated grade 9 several times.

The school was decorated for most holidays, turkeys at Thanksgiving, Christmas tree and a gift of candy and popcorn from the teacher, hearts and a valentine box. At recess everyone played together as one big happy family. Her brother Harvard and Cecil Frost would occasionally get into a fight with a bloody nose, but would end the day best of buddies.

Marian’s sister Marjorie taught at the school. Marian considered that she was harder on the brothers than on the other children. Some other boys would blame her brothers and they would get punished. Marian didn’t like that. Miss Farnsworth, Francis Parlin, Joe Bragdon, Loretta Cortrell, and Nora Seamans were some of her teachers. Her favorite was Marshall Berry. He wasn’t the best disciplinarian, but his lessons were fun. He also would carry Marian to school on his shoulders when the snow was deep. Miss Kelley was the critic teacher. She was a large woman who visited once a month and was called Wee Miss Mousie behind her back.

Some of the schoolmates that Marian remembers are Ethel McArthur, Laurence Frost, Bertha Frost, Florice Hunnewell, Irene Perkins, Edith Hunnewell, Arlene Perkins, Elwood and Ira Perkins, Edna Frost, Arnold Perkins, Carl and Cecil Frost, Elbridge McArthur, Eleanor Frost, Buster Holmes, and naturally her three brothers, Dana, Harvard, and Paul. Others were Ellis, Freda and Grace Maxwell, Helen Demers, Ethel Knowles, and Shirley Hunnewell.

Marian went to high school in Woodland in the fall of 1931. Fletcher Perkins was just starting his years at Hale School when Marian was getting ready to leave. He remembers playing ball in Charlie Brown’s pasture, behind the school. Charlie had a spring house down back of the school with a water pump. He remembers hearing the pump start and stop. His favorite teacher was Olive Edgerly, a nurse. She taught about the various body systems and the children would diagram them on the board. One day, the superintendent, Frank Day of Princeton, was visiting and Fletcher was asked to do the diagramming on the board. Mr. Day was quite impressed.

 

MEMORIES OF LOVERIN SCHOOL

Bert Varnum started school at Hale School where his Uncle True was the teacher. A few weeks later the town reopened Loverin School and he was transferred there where his sister Alice had been hired to teach. Bert spent the next 9 years here.

Bert Varnum helped with this drawing. The door and windows faced the north and the gable end toward the Robb Hill Road (Loverin Road) had no windows. The chimney was on the west end and the stove on the east end. The stove pipe radiated heat to the children below. This was not the original schoolhouse at this site. It disappeared during the Depression, likely moved.

This was the new schoolhouse in the district. The old one had been about one-half mile up the Robb Hill Road from the Airline. This building was one mile up the road. Bert had to travel a mile along the Airline and a second mile up the Robb Hill Road. His father, Earl Varnum, always kept a horse to get his children to school. The older children went to Hale school and the horse spent the day in the Grange stable. At Loverin District, the horse was kept in Alfred Perkins stable. Later on Bert’s sister Adla was teaching there and had a Model T touring car.

This schoolhouse was in an isolated neighborhood. The students that Bert remembers were Harris, Floyd, and Helen Brownlee, Grace, Viola, Ruth, and Dot Leaman, Bert and his brother Albert Varnum. Edwin Robb lived at the far end of the road, but drove his children over four miles to the Ryan School on the Airline in Baileyville (see issue 118, page 2) Bert could hear the wagon go by his school and Edwin clucking to his horse.

The last year for this school was 1929. Adla Varnum was the teacher and her four pupils were Harold and Gerald Perkins, Ruth Hall, and Bert. Ruth Hall boarded with Alfred and Carrie Perkins, as did the teachers excepting for the Varnums. School was in session for 30 weeks and there was a five-week vacation in winter.

We have no picture of this schoolhouse. It was unlike the Hale and Four Corners schools. This sketch shows the building from the road. Inside the door was a coatroom and woodshed. A door to the classroom was on the left.

One teacher between Alice and Adla Varnum was Pearl Hill of Calais. Her parents lived on the Hardscrabble Road and her father worked at Tori’s as the ice cream maker. In later years Bert would deliver cream to him in ten-gallon cans. Others teachers were Ada Mabey, and Charlotte Porter and Mabel McDowell, both of Princeton. Mabel was a good disciplinarian. She married Everett Perkins, one of the older sons of Alfred and Carrie.

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney Frost

Part 9

We leave the roaring twenties and enter the decade of the great depression. Pliney’s work again has been supplemented by biographical information gleaned from A-CHS files. Marion Cousins and Barbara McArthur provided additional information.

School year 1929-1930

Teaching - Nellie Tuell - $198.00; Ida Rosen - $360.00; Bessie Crosby, Dist. 1 - $220.00; Leona Egan, Dist. 1 - $144.00; Adla Varnum - $176.00; Nora Seamans, Dist. 2 - $726.00; Zella Cousins, Dist. 1 - $234.00, Superintendent’s Account; F. A. Day, Salary - $154.30; School Committee; Lester Craft, Chairman - $10.00; H. A. Lowe - $5.00; Harold Cousins - $5.00; Baileyville, tuition, $280.00; Calais, Tuition - $80.00; Princeton, Alexander proportional part of So. Princeton school 1927-1928 - $175.00; Princeton, tuition for one pupil 1928-29 - $50.00; Princeton, secondary tuition one pupil two terms - $60.00

Nellie Tuell was from Princeton. Ida Rosen was from Woodland where her father ran a men’s clothing store. Leona Egan (1909 – 1985) was the daughter of Daniel and Alwilda (Egan) Bryant of Princeton. On December 21, 1929 she married Verne Thornton of Topsfield. Adla Varnum (1906 – 1947) was a daughter of Earl and Carrie (Dwelley) Varnum. She lived with her parents at 989 Airline Road. She was a professional teacher before quitting to work with her father delivering daily products. Nora (Bunker) Seamans came from Franklin and in 1920 married Bernard. On the 1930 census she was living in the home of Bernice Frost and her brothers Carl and Evans at the Frost Homestead on Lanes Hill (1409 Airline Road where Joe Wallace lives today). Zela (Wallace) Cousins (1904 - 2000) married Harold Cousins on May 15, 1926. Harold’s first wife, Marcia (Flood) had died at childbirth in 1924. Harold, like most men in Alexander, was occupied in ‘general farming’ according to the census. We know he was a good builder and blacksmith. By 1929, Zela was raising Marcia’s children, Horace and Vera, plus Clarice and Glenna. The Cousins lived in the Scribner Place at 1886 Airline Road. Lester Craft, another general farmer who also was a good builder, and his wife Gladys (Perkins) lived at 1461 Airline Road at the top of Lane’s or Craft’s Hill. Their children in 1930 were Verna, Gerald and Dorothy (A-CHS member Dorothy McKeown). Herb and Maud (Howe) Lowe lived on the Green Hill Road with their 13-year-old daughter Eula (who eventually married Ben Perkins).


School year 1930-1931

Teaching - Nora Seamans, Dist. 2 - $242.00; Ida Rosen - $216.00; Zella Cousins, Dist. 1 - $198.00; Beatrice Perkins, Dist. 1 - $378.00; Loretta Cottrell, Dist. 2 - $420.00; Edna McArthur - $270.00; Town of Princeton, Alexander proportional Part of So. Princeton school for two years 1928-29, 1929-30 - $100.00; Tuition - City of Calais - $40.00; Baileyville - $280.00; Superintendence Account; F. A. Day, Salary, $156.48; School Committee - Fay McArthur, $10.00, Lester Craft $5.00, Harold Cousins $5.00

Beatrice Perkins was the 18-year old daughter of Alfred and Carrie Perkins. She lived with her parents on the Robb Hill Road. Loretta Cottrell taught at Hale School and came from Milltown. Nineteen year old Edna McArthur, daughter of Fay and Bertha lived with her parents on what we today call the McArthur Road, named for her father. Edna later married John Hood of Woodland.

School year 1931 – 1932

Teaching - Edna McArthur - $648.00, Loretta Cottrell - $220.00, Helen Leighton - $380.00, Beatrice Perkins - $ 535.00, Transporting Pupils – Beatrice Perkins - $45.00, Tuition – Baileyville - $580.00, Princeton, Alexander's proportional part of South Princeton school - $50.00, F. A. Day, Superintendent's Salary - $156.48 School Committee Fay McArthur - term expires 1933 - $10.00, Lester Craft - term expires 1934 - $5.00, Harold Cousins - term expires 1932- $5.00

Helen L. Leighton was from Baileyville. Her husband Cecil was also a teacher. Helen (1900 – 1974) was a daughter of John and Carrie (Libby) Ryan who we met on the Staples Road (issue 111, page 4)

Hale School – ca 1931

Standing in back: Ethel Knowles, Paul Dwelley; Standing in long row: Elbridge McArthur, Morris Perkins, Florence McArthur, Arlene Perkins, Verna Craft, Marian Dwelley, Benjamin McArthur, Florice Hunnewell; Standing on right side: Irene Perkins (plaid skirt), Eleanor Frost, Alice Frost, Winifred Holst, Genevieve Hogan, Alberta McArthur; Kneeling: Francis Perkins, Gerald Craft, Walter Perkins, Merle Knowles, Fletcher Perkins; Sitting: James "Buster" Holmes, Donald Perkins, Ivan Perkins, Richard Frost, Billy Holst, Lawrence Frost. Image loaned and scholars identified by Marian (Dwelley) Cousins

 

School year 1932-33

Teaching – Edna McArthur - $508.00, Evelyn Pottle - $ 240.00, Helen Leighton - $260.00, Beatrice McBride - $536.00, Transportation of pupils – Beatrice McBride - $61.40, Tuition – Calais - $60.00, Baileyville $280.00, Superintendent F. A. Day - $156.88, School Committee – Fay McArthur (1933) - $10.00, Lester Craft (1934) - $5.00, Raymond Flood (1935) - $5.00

Evelyn Pottle was the youngest daughter of Lincoln and Lizzie (Perkins) Flood. It was her sister Marcia Cousins who had died in 1924. Evelyn married Harold Pottle from Perry on November 26, 1931 and for a number of years they lived with and looked after her parents at 731Cooper Road. Beatrice McBride was Beatrice Perkins who we met in 1930. She married Malcolm McBride of Machias and apparently lived at home since she was paid to transport scholars, likely from the Robb Hill a.k.a. Loverin a.k.a. Alf Perkins District to Hale School. The new man on the school committee was Raymond Flood, a brother of Evelyn. He and Doris (Wood) lived across the road from his parents. Unlike other men in Alexander, Raymond's occupation was garage owner. His children in 1932 were Russell, Bernard and Paul.

School year 1933-34

Teaching - Edna McArthur - $390.00, Beatrice McBride – $238.00, Olive Edgerly - $246.00, Evelyn Pottle - $324.00, Elementary Conveyance - Clarence Perkins - $104.00, Beatrice McBride - $10.40, Tuition - City of Calais - $180.00, Town of Oakland - $25.00, School Committee - Lester Craft - $10.00, Raymond Flood - $5.00, Harold Cousins - $5.00

Olive Edgerly (1906 – 1943) was from South Princeton, a sister of George Edgerly who married Doris Dwelley) Strout after Lyman died. Her parents were Herbert and Rosemond (Hatfield) Edgerly. (Herbert was the 17th child of Isaac Bickford Edgerly and his three wives.) Olive married widower George Flood on August 29, 1942; George was a brother of Evelyn, Raymond and Marcia already mentioned. Care must be taken not to confuse this Olive Edgerly with the one who married Hubert Dwelley in 1944. Clarence Perkins (1900) was the oldest child of Alfred and Carrie Perkins; Beatrice’s older brother. He also lived at home where he was occupied as a general farmer.

School year 1934-35

Teaching - Olive Edgerly - $441.70, Edna McArthur - $372.00, Evelyn Pottle - $340.80, Tuition - Town of Baileyville - $$840.00, City of Calais - $80.00, Town of Oakland - $49.00, Milo - $170.00, Elementary Transportation – Clarence Perkins - $81.60, Superintendent Salary – F. A. Day - $140.78, School Committee - Lyston Frost - $10.00, Harold Cousins - $5.00, Raymond Flood - $5.00

Lyston Frost (1897) was a son of Thomas Edward and Dora (McGraw) Frost. He was married to Hazel Cousins, sister of Harold. Their children in 1934 were Lawrence and Darryl.

SEVEN POINTERS AT BARKER SCHOOL IN WOODLAND

This headline on page 12 of the 2006 issue of Paper Talks Magazine may have left some younger readers confused as to why all those pupils had their picture taken. What is a Seven Pointer? (Thank you Marion Cousins for giving A-CHS this copy of Paper Talks). Carleton Cooper allowed A-CHS to scan many of his family pictures and other old items. Among these items are two Certificates of Health from the State of Maine which described Carleton as a Seven Point Child for 1934 and 1935 while a student at North Union School in Cooper. Carleton had made a seven-point star with his picture at the center. The star points are labeled teeth, throat, birth registration, weight, vision, hearing, and posture. Carleton reported that he and the other seven pointers were taken to Pembroke and marched around Union Square.

 

School year 1935-36

Teaching - Olive Edgerly - $438.90, Edna McArthur - $455.40, Evelyn Pottle - $408.00, Tuition – Baileyville - $80.00, Milo - $$33.30, Calais - $20.00, Grand Lake Stream - $40.00, F. A. Day, Salary, $140.98, balance for last year $23.58, School Committee - Harold Cousins, Chairman, - $10.00, Lyston Frost $5.00, Raymond Flood - $5.00

School year 1936-37

Teaching - Olive Edgerly - $438.90, Edna McArthur - $353.40, Evelyn Pottle - $125.40, Agnes White - $240.00, Tuition – Calais - $60.00, Baileyville - $180.00, Salary of Supt. - $140.88

School Committee - Lyston Frost - $10.00, Raymond Flood - $5.00, Harold Cousins - $5.00

Agnes White was Agnes Berry from Jacksonville. She married Carter White and they lived in Grand Lake Stream. Eda (Dwelley) Varnum tells us in her 1938 diary that Agnes was teaching that year at Cedar School and was living at the Nelson and Leota (Cousins) Flood home at 842 Cooper Road. Agnes was musical and was a piano teacher.

 

School year 1937-38
Teaching Salary - Edna McArthur - $136.80, Jessie Ayers - $108.00, Olive Edgerly - $ 372.40, Agnes White - $180.00, Evelyn Hall - $132.00, Florence Carlow - $252.00, Tuition - Grand Lake Stream - $20.00, Calais - $10.00, Baileyville - $140.00, Supt. Salary, (F. A. Day) - $140.88, School Committee - Raymond Flood - $10.00, Lyston Frost - $5.00, Harold Cousins - $5.00

Jessie Ayer (1884 – 1946) was from Charlotte, a daughter of William and Addie (Fisher) Ayer. Unlike many of the day, she was a graduate of the normal school at Machias, in 1917. She never married. Florence Carlow taught at the Four Corners School and boarded with Harold and Zela Cousins. She was from Robbinston and would soon marry.

School year 1938-39

Teaching - Olive Edgerly - $146.00, Florence Carlow Diffin - $72.00, Agnes White - $394.00, Zela Cousins - $346.00, Eva Bennett - $308.00, Tuition – Baileyville - $180.00, Salary of Supt. ( F. A. Day) - $140.88, School Committee - $20.00

 

Those who defied my attempt to describe are Bessie Crosby, Evelyn Hall and Eva Bennett. Additions and corrections are most welcome. Grace Meader of Calais sent the following addition for the article in the last issue. "One of the early teachers was my aunt, daughter of Elizabeth Ann (Russell) and Thomas Clinton Sprague. Carrie Blanchard Sprague (1902 – 1974) was also known as Caroline and Carolyn and grew up in Baileyville. She was a granddaughter of Martha Louisa (Stevens) and Isaac Lord Sprague and a great-granddaughter of Jacob and Mary Isabella (Crockett) Stevens of Crawford. In 1924 Carrie married John Willard Dwelley (1904 – 1976), son of Oliver and Bessie (Neal) Dwelley of Alexander. She was a resident of Robbinston and retired after teaching many years in local schools". Thank you, Grace. I appreciate that you took the time to share your knowledge with our readers.

MEMORIES OF CEDAR SCHOOL

Barbara (Carlow) McArthur lived with her grandparents across the road from Cedar School. Ida Rosen was boarding at her house and suggested that Barbara could start school at age four. Her grandmother would walk her to school, but the way home was complicated by a flock of domestic geese, they would chase after her and she was afraid of them. She would walk on the long pile of cordwood her grandfather had stacked by the Burnt Barn Hill Road. He cut wood as a cash crop.

Her grandfather was the janitor and each day put a fresh pail of water on a shelf beside the door. There was a dipper there but the kids drank from paper cups made from arithmetic paper. While Barbara was a student here her other teachers were Agnes White of Grand Lake Stream, Evelyn Flood (Pottle), and Edna McArthur (Hood). Mr. Day of Princeton was the superintendent and Barbara was afraid of him. During most of her nine years here, her schoolmates were her brother Albert, Bernard, Russell and Paul Flood, and Genevieve and Sherman Flood. Kathleen Miner and Freda Worrell were at the school during some of that time.

Barbara and Albert went home for lunch. The others brought lunch in a brown bag. Recesses were 15 minutes long and in winter everyone would get on the warm clothes, and have time for one slide down Gooch Hill. Often times the teacher would ring the bell before they got up the hill. When snow conditions were right they would slide down the hill behind the school. A pasture with a barbed wire fence at the bottom. This was called going to China and required a quick maneuver just before the fence.

Larry Keck added onto the schoolhouse when he used it as a home. Originally the building had a door and one window on the roadside. There were five windows along the south side of the room and doors to the toilets in the back. The teacher’s desk was in the southwest corner, on the right when the students came in the front door. The black board was on the south wall behind the teacher’s desk. A big pot bellied stove was in the center of the room and three rows of student desks. This same arrangement existed when Barbara’s daughter Donna attended this school.

Donna (McArthur) Brown grew up in the same house as her mother Barbara did. By this time a sink and hand pump was in the back of the room and Barbara (Carlow) McArthur was school janitor. A stage had been arranged in the back of the room where the students put on a talent show each Friday, reading poems, singing, etc. Also on Friday, the students prepared their lunch on the big stove. This was the only day of the week that Donna stayed for lunch.

Bertha Dwelley was Donna’s only teacher at this school. Donna remembers her as a wonderful teacher; she made learning fun. Bertha often wore a necklace with a dark green stone. Donna admired this and Bertha gave it to Donna the day before she died. Donna still has the necklace, and lives in the Cedar School building. What memories!

Donna’s fellow schoolmates were Freda, John, Charles and Emma Hatfield, Lorna, Mavis, and Lew Dwelley, and her McArthur siblings, Philip, Jackie and Debbie. The Pottle boys (Clifton, Merrill and Basil were sons of Harold and Evelyn (Flood) Pottle) attended school about this time. Donna went on to Calais for high school. There she lived with her Grammie Belle, worked at the Advertiser office and Newberry's and graduated in 1963.

 

MEMORIES OF FOUR CORNERS SCHOOL

Clarice (Cousins) Perkins spent all of grades one through nine at this one room schoolhouse. This was in the mid 30s into the early 40s. Her favorite teacher was Edna McArthur, now Edna Hood. Edna was her teacher for several years. Florence Carlow also was a teacher. In grade eight Marsha Williams was her teacher and in grade nine, Walter McFarlane.

She and her sister Glenna walked to and from school with the Perkins kids from down near the Crawford line. Those kids were Audrey, Freda, Erland, Arthur, Phyllis, and Geneva. During the first few years the students carried their lunches, then a government program supplied hot soup and crackers at noon. Clarice remembers that the school year was like that of today, September through June.

Some of her schoolmates were Albert Perkins, brothers Ivan and Donnie Perkins, and Carroll Niles. Other schoolmates were Milton and Douglas Hunnewell, Alma and Austin Frost, and Carl Perkins. Luther Thornton was a student there the year his Aunt Marsha Williams taught. Her favorite girl friends were Rena McArthur, Audrey Hunnewell, and Grace Findley. Grace lived with her sister, Evelyn Aylward, Chick’s wife. Aylwards had the store kitty-corner from the schoolhouse.

This building had but one front door, with the coatroom on the left and another room on the right where the water cooler was kept. The teacher’s desk and stove were on the left side of the big room, as was the blackboard. Scholars practiced their math on this board. The windows were on the east side and the toilets were attached to the back of the building.

Haley-Over was played at recess and at noon. A team would be on either side of the schoolhouse. A ball would be thrown over the roof. If the ball were caught, the one with the ball would run around the building and tag someone from the opposing team. That person would then be a member of the other team. Tin Can was another game, something like hide and go seek.

 

A COUNTRY KID GOES TO THE CITY SCHOOL

MILDRED HOLST REMEMBERS HER YEARS AT CALAIS ACADEMY.

 

Mildred (Flood) Holst, born May 1, 1928 a daughter of Bert (1890 - 1978) and Eva (1907 - 1945) (Seavey) Flood. As a child she lived in Cooper, then the family moved to the corner of the Cooper and Spearin Roads in Alexander. Excepting five months working in New Jersey after Christmas 1946, Mildred has lived her adult life in Alexander.

Mildred finished grade eight at Hale School in June 1941. Her teacher that year was Dorothy McFarland, who Mildred describes as "a really good caring person, the best teacher I ever had." She encouraged Mildred to spend another year at Hale School and then go to Calais Academy. Mildred went back to Hale the next year, but Mary Severance was her teacher.

 

In September 1942 Mildred started at the Academy and boarded with Wilson and Loretta Frost. Stephen Wilson Frost (1881 – 1958) was a son of Augustus and Josephine (Quimby) Frost. This Frost family was from Alexander. Wilsie married Lottie Flood, divorced, then married Loretta Coleman. Wilsie and Lottie had Norman, Frank, and Roger. The two children that Mildred cared for were Lorraine and Shirley from the second marriage.

Wilsie operated the Corner Lunch at the corner of Maine and Church streets. The Frosts had two children. They lived in two large rooms above the restaurant. As with most kids from the country, Mildred had to work her board. For the Frost family, that included hanging out the wet wash (that had been sent out for washing, but returned wet) then ironing all the clothes. That was before drip dry and permanent press. Mildred had to look after the children and cook supper if they didn’t eat in the restaurant. She also had to help clean the house.

 

The Frosts and Mildred moved to 8 High Street, then to 120 North Street and then at the beginning of her junior year to Union Street. At this time Mildred’s mother felt Mildred was working too hard for her board and Mildred moved in with Floyd and Vira Frost on South Street across from Cleveland Street. Floyd Frost (1897 – 1955) was a son of Thomas Edward and Dora (McGraw) Frost of Alexander. He married Vira Beany; they had 4 children; Fletcher Richard, Alice, Norris, and Wilfred. Here Mildred looked after their granddaughter Diane, daughter of Alice, a much easier task than things had been in the other home.

 

During her senior year, her mother Eva (Seavey) Flood moved to Swan Street in Calais where they rented rooms from Harold ‘Shorty" and Marion Hartford. Marion was another daughter of Ernest and Gertrude Seavey. Mildred’s mother died that fall and her father sold the cows and the family moved to an apartment on Church Street. Mildred graduated from Calais Academy in June 1946. The Academy burned on February 2, 1945 so she had classes in improvised classrooms for her last year and a half.

 

The one thing that Mildred wants understood that going off to high school was the total disruption of her life. Mildred, like others then, moved out of her home and away from her family to live with a different family with different expectations, rules, and food. She, like others, moved from a small comfortable hometown environment and the security of a familiar school and teachers to attend a strange school full of strange faces in a city full of strangers. It was not easy for a country kid to go to a city school.

 

The following generation had only to overcome part of the problem. Most of these scholars lived at home and traveled to Calais or Woodland by private car, often operated as a business by the driver. Mildred’s son Roger drove to Calais for high school. For the school year 1969–70 the Town of

Alexander started paying for transportation to Calais for high school students. Even then country kids had to over come the strange school and teachers and also their lack of background in many extra curricular activities. Today the town has a bus haul pupils to Calais and another bus haul them to Woodland. Now teachers and community members volunteer to lead after school activities such as sports, chorus, band, and art. With this background, country kids are better prepared as they go off to that strange school with the strange teachers.

 

 

A DAY IN A ONE ROOM SCHOOL

Many younger readers never attended a one-room school so might be interested in how one teacher organized the school day. This plan is from Laura Beam’s A Maine Hamlet which depicts life in Marshfield, Maine between 1894 and 1904. Ida McPheters may have organized her teaching day in this manner at Ash Ridge in 1890. How does this fit with the one-room schools in other towns during the first half of the twentieth century?

9:00 – 9:15 ..….. Bible Reading, Lord’s Prayer, Calling the Roll

9:15 – 9:30 ..….. Reading I (Arithmetic II on blackboard)

9:30 – 10:00 ….. Reading II & III (Arithmetic I on blackboard)

10:00 – 10:30 … Arithmetic III (Grammar I on blackboard)

10:30 – 10:45 … Recess (Tutor older pupils in Grammar)

10:45 – 11:15 … Geography II (Geography I on blackboard)

11:15 – 11:45 … History I

11:45 – 12:00 … Hygiene

12:00 – 1:30 ….. Dinner

1:30 – 1:45 …… Hymn Singing

1:45 – 2:15 …… Writing on Monday and Wednesday

Advanced Reading on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

2:15 – 2:35 ……. History II (Arithmetic or Grammar on blackboard)

2:35 – 2:45 ……. Reading I

2:45 – 3:00 ……. Recess (Tutor older pupils in Arithmetic)

3:00 – 3:30 ……. Advanced Arithmetic and Algebra

3:30 – 4:00 ……. Spelling

 

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney Frost

Part 10

Pliney took the following accounts from annual town reports. Since town reports have additional information about our schools, this article will tell about some new expenses and detail not previously mentioned. Pliney did not mention expenditures for textbooks and supplies. As in the first nine parts of this series, I have attempted to describe the people and situations found within the reports. My additions are in Italics. jd

School year 1939-40

Teachers: Agnes White - $130.00, Zela Cousins - $130.00, Eva Bennett - $140.00, Marcia Williams - $286.00, Norma Eaton - $195.00, Evelyn Hall - $91.00, Mary Severance - $308.00,
Town of Baileyville for tuition - $120.00
Superintendence: Superintendent's Salary, (F. A. Day) - $140.88, School Committee members -Lyston Frost - 1940, Raymond Flood - 1941, Roland Perkins - 1942

Janitors and Cleaning: District No. 1 - $37.80, District No. 2 - $33.80, District No. 3 - $52.40, Banking - $4.00

Fuel: Roland Perkins - $98.00, Raymond Flood - $12.00

Mildred Holst pointed out that School Committee members were from each of the three school districts. Agnes (Berry) White, wife of Carter White, lived in Grand Lake Stream and boarded here in Alexander with Nelson Flood’s family while teaching at Cedar School. The fall 2005 Newsletter of the Grand Lake Stream Historical Society mentions Agnes and Carter in the continuing series entitled The Dobsis Diaries. Agnes was at Dobsis helping prepare the Thanksgiving dinner on November 24, 1937. On December 9 they "left for GLS this morning at 7 A. M. Walked near the shore of Compus on ice with a hand sled loaded with their supplies…. Agnes is going to teach school. Spitting snow at 9: 30 A. M." Our issue 127 states that Agnes started teaching in the school year 1936 – 37. Zela (Wallace) Cousins (1904 – 2000) lived on the Airline with her husband Harold. She would be a long time teacher in Alexander. Eva Bennett taught at Hale School in 1938 and 39. Her student Pauline Flood DeWald remembers that her father, Bert Flood thought Eva was a Catholic and asked if she ate meat on Friday. As a third grade student, Pauline couldn’t understand the relationship between eating meat and religion. Eva boarded with Ralph and Linnie McArthur on the Spearin Road. Marcia (Grover) Williams was Frank William’s wife and lived on the Airline in Crawford near Azor Brook, Frank and Marcia were raising her nephew Luther Thornton. Mary Severance, wife of Lawrence, was from Kossuth. She taught at Hale School and boarded with Ralph and Linnie (Cousins) McArthur on the Spearin Road. Lyston Frost was a dairy farmer and lived at the Townsend place on the Cooper Road. Raymond Flood repaired cars at his home on the Cooper Road. Roland Perkins lived on Bailey Hill on the Airline. Banking did not concern money, but had to do with putting sand, sawdust, or boughs along the foundation of buildings to keep out the winter wind. The fuel was wood, preferably dry hardwood cut stove length and split. Some call this manufactured wood, ready for the stove.

School year 1940-41

Teachers: Bessie Brown – $351.00, Mary Severance - $140.00, Marcia Williams - $130.00, Dorothy McFarland - $268.80 in District #2, Walter McFarland - $261.95 in District #1, Mrs. Reginald Dority - $13.30.

City of Calais for tuition - $60.00, Plantation of Grand Lake Stream for tuition - $40.00, Town of Baileyville for tuition – $40.60, Town of Princeton for Tuition - $60.00

Noland Perkins - $12.60 for transportation of pupils, Walter McFarland $36.00 for transportation of pupils.

Salary of superintendent (F. A. Day) - $139.96, School Committee: Raymond Flood – 1941, Roland Perkins – 1942, Lyston Frost – 1943.

Janitors and kindling - $118.60

Fuel: Roland Perkins - $15.00, Roy Carlow - $16.00, Lyman Strout - $96.00

Noland Perkins, born 1890 son of Albion and Rhoda (Crafts) Perkins married Gladys Johnson and they lived on the McArthur or Lyons Road. Lyman Strout (1908 – 1945), son of Willie and Nettie (Fickett) Strout was married to Doris Dwelley and lived on the Cooper Road in what was the rectory.

Dorothy and Walter McFarland lived in Milltown Maine. Both were teachers and they commuted. Dorothy was at hale school this year. Reginald Dority and his wife also lived in Milltown. He would become superintendent.

School year 1941-42

Instruction: Walter McFarland - 11 weeks in District 1 - $135.85, Evelyn Pottle - 21 weeks - $299.95, Dorothy McFarland – 11 weeks in District 2 - $146.30, Jean Smith – 14 weeks - $196.00, Mary Severance – 7 weeks - $93.10, Bessie Brown – 13 weeks - $169.00, Agnes White – 19 weeks - $266.00, Maine Teachers’ Retirement - $43.97

Conveyance: Walter McFarland – 11 weeks - $22.00, Jean Smith - 14 weeks - $28.00, Roland Perkins – 7 weeks - $70.00,

Tuition and Interest on same: City of Calais - $131.95, Town of Baileyville - $182.60, Town of Brownville - $101.50, Town of Grand Lake Stream - $11.85.

Superintendent and School Committee: Salary of Frank A. Day, 4 months - $45.00, R. H. Dority, 8 months - $90.00, Roland Perkins - $10.00 - term expires March 1942, Lyston Frost - $5.00 – term expires 1943, Nelson Flood - $5.00 – term expires 1944

Janitor and Cleaning: Darrell Frost – $32.00 for 32 weeks, Douglas Hunnewell - $25.00 for 25 weeks, Carl Perkins - $7.00 for 7 weeks, Bernard Flood - $14.00 for 14 weeks, Sherman Flood - $18.00 for 18 weeks, Ellen Perkins - $10.00, Roland Perkins - $4.00, Wayne Dwelley, $4.00, Leota Flood - $5.00, Darrell Frost - $8.00

Fuel: Darrell Frost - $9.80 for kindling, Nelson Flood - $112.00 for 14 cords wood, Douglas Hunnewell - $2.40 for kindling.

Evelyn (Flood) Pottle, daughter of Lincoln and Lizzie (Perkins) Flood was living at her parents’ home on the Cooper Road. Her mother and her husband Harold Pottle lived there also. She had taken time from teaching after the birth of her first child, Clifton. Jean Smith was from Milltown. She taught at Hale School and the scholars gave her a hard time. Douglas "Dukey" Hunnewell (1930 – 1998) lived with his parents Morey and Marjorie (James) Hunnewell on Bailey Hill on the Airline. Carl Perkins (1932 -), son of Roland and Eva (Cooper) Perkins also lived on Bailey Hill on the Airline. Spearin’s parents lived in Alexander. Bernard Flood (1926 -) lived with his parents, Raymond and Doris (Woods) Flood, on the Cooper Road. Sherman Flood (1928 - 2000) lived with his parents Nelson and Leota (Cousins) Flood on the Cooper Road. Ellen Hazelton Perkins was Vinal Perkins wife. Wayne Dwelley (1907 – 1971) lived on the Cooper Road near Dwelleys or Pleasant Lake. Darrell Frost (1927 – 1977) was a son of Lyston and Hazel (Cousins) Frost and lived with them on Townsend Hill.

Four Corners School on May 6, 1942

Rena MacArthur took this picture of her classmates. In the back row we have Phyllis Perkins, Evelyn Pottle who was the teacher, Alma Frost, Glenna Cousins, Arthur Perkins and Douglas Hunnewell. The three in the middle row are Geneva Perkins, Freddie Bohanon and Austin Frost. In front are Enid MacArthur, Mildred Hunnewell and Barbara Hunnewell. Different descendants of immigrant Robert MacArthur spell their family name differently. Bob died in 1950 and has the ‘a’ on his gravestone. His granddaughter Rena supplied the image and names.

 

School year 1942-43

Instruction: Agnes White – 13 weeks at Cedar (District 3) - $182.00, Frances McCurdy – 19 weeks at Cedar - $321.75, Evelyn Pottle – 11 weeks at Four Corner (District 1) - $156.75, Zela Cousins – 21 weeks at Four Corners - $334.60, Mary Severance, 26 weeks at Hale (District 2) - $405.65, Eva Flood, 2 weeks at Hale School - $31.60

Conveyance: Roland Perkins - $110.00, Bus Insurance $11.16

High School Tuition; City of Calais - $199.48, Town of Baileyville - $151.50

Superintendent and School Committee: R. H. Dority - $141.00

Lyston Frost – (1943) – $10.00, Nelson Flood – (1944) $5.00, Roland Perkins (1945) $5.00 Janitors and Cleaning: Sherman Flood - $15.00, Alfred Gordon - $12.00, Alvin Carlow - $5.00, Leota Flood - $14.50, Darrell Frost - $13.00, Mary severance - $15.00, Carl Perkins $11.00, Mrs. Almond Frost - $5.00, Douglas Hunnewell - $6.00, Austin Frost - $6.00, Arthur Perkins - $9.00

Fuel: Alvin Carlow - $1.00, Alfred Gordon - $2.80, Nelson Flood - $140.00, Austin Frost - $1.20, Darrell Frost - $2.60, Douglas Hunnewell - $6.20, Arthur Perkins - $1.80, Carl Perkins - $2.20, Mary Severance - $2.80

Eva (Seavey) Flood (1907 - 1945), daughter of Ernest and Gertrude (Roberts) Seavey of Crawford taught at Hale school until 1945. Her husband was Bert Flood and the family lived at the intersection of Spearin and Cooper roads, across from Hale School. She was the mother of Mildred and Pauline who have helped on this article. Alfred Gordon was a state kid who lived at Nelson and Leota Floods on the Cooper road. Alvin Carlow (1869 - 1954) lived across from Cedar School on Gooch Hill. He was father of Belle Carlow, Grandfather of Barbara McArthur, and great-grandfather of Donna Brown and several other A-CHS members. Mrs. Almond Frost was Margaret Young Cummings of St. Stephen. They were married in 1928. They lived on the Airline on Bailey Hill. Austin Frost was a son of Almond and Margaret. Arthur Perkins (1929 - 2001), son of Edgar and Lenora (Carlow) Perkins, lived on the Airline, last house before the Crawford line.

1943 - 44 - No Town Report

1944 – 45 - No Town Report

School year 1945 - 46

Instruction: Ethel Bagley - $78.44, Eva Flood - $244.40, Evelyn Pottle - $652.67, Lena Smith - $128.10, Helen Southard - $522.90, Ada Wheeler - $522.90, Maine Teachers’ Retirement - $56.49, Govt. Tax - $155.00

Conveyance: Rupert Day - $195.00

High School Tuition: Town of Baileyville - $304.50, City of Calais - $182.70, Portland - $50.75

Supervision Account: Superintendent Reginald Dority - $189.00, School Committee Lyston Frost - $10.00, Hubert Dwelley - $5.00, Robert Thistlewood - $5.00

Janitors and Cleaning: Alvin Carlow - $68.00, Hubert Dwelley - $17.50, Eva Flood - $26.00, Charles Frost - $42.00, Carl Perkins - $42.00, Roland Perkins - $15.00

Fuel: Hubert Dwelley - $244.00

Helen Southard was from Woodland; she married Paul Ward of Meddybemps in September 1946 and presently lives in Princeton. Ada Wheeler also was from Woodland. Rupert Day (1903 – 1991) came from Wesley to Crawford. He drove the stage from Wesley to Crawford, then from Crawford to Baring. Most readers will remember that the "stage" was the vehicle that carried the mail, passengers and occasionally a package. The term came from the real stagecoach of the Airline Stage Company that had done the same between 1857 and 1887. Hubert Dwelley (18883 – 1966) lived on the Cooper Road near Dwelleys Lake. On December 8, 1944 he and Olive D. Edgerly were married. She was not the teacher who married George Flood in 1942. Robert Thistlewood was married to Verna Crafts and they lived in a small house on the Crafts’ place at the top of Lanes Hill. Charles Frost (1935 -) was a younger brother or Darrell mentioned in 1941.

Addition: Olive H. Edgerly (1906 – 1943) taught at Hale School in 1936–7 and 1937–8. Pauline Flood DeWald was one of her students. This was the Olive that married George Flood in 1942, his second wife. Her name was Olivia. Thank you Pauline for this and thank you Mildred Holst for the following memories. Pauline and Mildred are sisters.

Names of those we could not identify: Norma Eaton, Evelyn Hall, Bessie Brown, Frances McCurdy, Ethel Bagley and Lena Smith. Please send your identifications on these and any other additions jd.

1947 ALEXANDER NEWS

Calais Advertiser

The Cedar School held its program and tree Friday evening, Dec. 19 with a large attendance.

Teacher - Marilyn Gillespie; Welcome Songs – School; Welcome – Freda Hatfield; Jolly Old Santa – Merrill Pottle; Expecting Santa – Steven Hatfield; Santa’s Lunch – Freda Worrell; Getting A Christmas Tree – Harley Dwelley; Away in a Manger – School; Greetings to Santa – Maxine Flood; Santa – Clifton Pottle; Bob’s Letter to Santa – Norman Dwelley; The Brown Family (a play) – School; Old Christmas – Charlotte Worrell; Santa Claus – Lawson Hatfield; Silent Night – School; If Santa in an Auto Came – Clifton Pottle; Santa Claus – Maxine Flood; The First Noel – Freda and Norman Hatfield; Darning the Christmas Stockings – Lawson Hatfield and Norman Dwelley; The Babe of Bethlehem – Freda Worrell; A Christmas Eve Thought – Harley Dwelley; A Christmas Box from Aunt Jane (a play) – School; A Present from Dottie – Lawson Hatfield; If Santa lived in a Shoe – Steven Hatfield.

 

Songs by the school with guitar accompaniment played by Lawson Hatfield and Norman Dwelley included White Christmas, Jolly Santa, Star Bright, Christmas Time, and Lullaby and Goodnight. Santa arrived on time and distributed the presents, after which music by the Hatfield family and Dwelley boys was enjoyed.

 

1948 ALEXANDER NEWS

Calais Advertiser

Alexander Grange held its regular meeting January 14th with a fair attendance. Games were enjoyed by all and a delicious oyster stew was made and served by Lawrence Flood.

Miss Marilyn Gillespie, who is teaching at the Cedar School, spent the weekend at her home in Meddybemps.

Miss Barbara Dean spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Flood.

Mrs. Amanda Hunnewell was visiting Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Carlow.



ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney Frost

Part 11

Here we present more facts about our schools with editor’s comments in Italics. We did not find anything about Gladys Kneeland, nor a hometown for Bertha Leeman. Additions and corrections are welcome. jd

School year 1946 – 47

Instruction: Zela Cousins - $550.05, Bertha Leeman - $199.85, Edna McArthur - $599.55, Evelyn Pottle - $751.10, Helen Stoddard - $404.80, Lida Southard - $328.90, Ada Wheeler - $60.72, Govt. Tax - $234.70, Maine Retirement system - $50.00

Secondary Tuition: City of Calais - $91.35, Town of Baileyville - $712.95

Supervision Account: Reginald Dority – 11 months $173.25, School Committee: Hubert Dwelley (1947) – $10.00, Robert Thistlewood (1948) - $5.00, Frank Dwelley (1949) - $5.00

Janitors and Cleaning: Alvin Carlow - $30.00, Hubert Dwelley - $34.00, Mrs. Paul Dwelley - $7.00, Charles Frost - $32.00, Mrs. Curtis Frost - $7.00, Darrell Frost - $22.50, Edna McArthur - $6.00, Carl Perkins - $32.00, Carleton Strout - $28.50, Leota Worrell - $28.50

Fuel: Frank Dwelley - $128.00, Hubert Dwelley - $144.00, Elbridge McArthur for trucking wood - $2.00

Zela (Wallace) Cousins (1904 – 2000) lived on the Airline with her husband Harold. Bertha Leeman taught at Cedar School. Edna McArthur was a daughter of Fay and Bertha (Cheney) McArthur. They lived on the McArthur Road. Evelyn (Flood) Pottle, daughter of Lincoln and Lizzie (Perkins) Flood was living at her parents’ home on the Cooper Road. Her mother and her husband Harold Pottle lived there also. She had taken time from teaching after the birth of her first child, Clifton. Sisters Helen and Lida Southard were from Woodland, Helen married Paul Ward of Meddybemps in September 1946 and presently lives in Princeton. Lida (January 18, 1928 – May 2, 2004) married Carleton Cooper in September 1947 and they lived most of their married years on the Green Hill Road in Cooper. Ada Wheeler also was from Woodland. Hubert Dwelley (1883 – 1966) lived on the Cooper Road near Dwelleys Lake. On December 8, 1944 he and Olive D. Edgerly were married. She was not the teacher who married George Flood in 1942. Robert Thistlewood was married to Verna Crafts and they lived in a small house on the Crafts’ place at the top of Lanes Hill. Frank Dwelley, a son of Llewellyn and Fannie (Fenlason) Dwelley, lived down by Dwelleys Lake. Alvin Carlow (1869 – 1954) lived across from Cedar School on Gooch Hill. He was father of Belle Carlow, Grandfather of Barbara McArthur, and great-grandfather of Donna Brown and several other A-CHS members. Mrs. Paul Dwelley was Rowena (White) Dwelley. Her parents were Coolidge and Eva White. Her father had come to Alexander from Weld to work for Stowell – MacGregor. Charles and Darrell Frost were sons of Lyston and Hazel (Cousins) Frost and lived at the Townsend Place on Townsend Hill. Mrs. Curtis Frost was Hazel (Bohanon) Frost. They lived on the South Princeton Road. Carl Perkins, son of Roland and Eva (Cooper) Perkins lived with his parents on Bailey Hill, north side of the Airline. Carleton Strout was Allen and Arlene Strout’s son; they lived at the Four Corners before selling the place to Max and Alberta Berry. Leota Worrell was the daughter of Alice and Herbert Perkins. They lived on Gooch Hill. Elbridge McArthur, son of Ralph and Linnie (Cousins) McArthur was married to Barbara Carlow.

School year 1947 – 48

Teaching: Bertha Leeman - $485.35, Zela Cousins - $1040.20, Edna McArthur - $1140.64, Marilyn Gillespie - $489.84

Tuition: $609.00

Reginald Dority - $204.75, School Committee: Robert Thistlewood - $10.00, Frank Dwelley - $5.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $5.00

Janitors: Carleton Strout - $28.50, Leota Worrell - $61.50, Darrell Frost - $25.50, Frank Dwelley - $7.35, Ethel Hunnewell - $33.00, Edna McArthur - $4.50, Louise Flood - $27.50

Fuel: Floyd Hunnewell - $247.20. Dennys River Electric Coop. - $28.50

Marilyn Gillespie was a daughter of Roy and Alice Gillespie of Meddybemps. The Christmas party was on Friday December 19, 1947. Floyd and Ethel (Knowles) Hunnewell lived on the Airline near the Four Corners School. Louise Flood, daughter of Bert and Eva (Seavey) Flood, would later marry Pliney Frost. Dennys River Electric Coop was established to bring electricity to the rural area including Charlotte, Meddybemps, Cooper, and Alexander. It grew and changed its name to Eastern Maine Electric Coop.

School year 1948 – 49

Instruction: Edna McArthur - $1347.46, Zela Cousins - $500.95, Marilyn Gillespie - $1021.64, Gladys Kneeland - $527.60, Internal Revenue - $306.50, Employee’s Retirement System - $182.35

Conveyance – Howard E. Towle - $160.00

High School Tuition: Baileyville - $253.75, Calais - $434.81, Princeton - $15.22, Elementary Tuition: Princeton - $31.50

Superintendent: Bernard B. Pierce - $222.00. School Committee: Frank Dwelley (1949), Floyd Hunnewell (1950), and Robert Thistlewood (1951)

Janitors: Louise Flood - $34.00, Leota Worrell - $74.00, Ethel Hunnewell - $74.00, Frank Dwelley - $12.00, Gerald Craft - $12.00, Bertha Dwelley - $21.00, Norma Frost - $40.00

Fuel: Frank Dwelley - $240.00. Lights: Dennys River Electric - $40.73

Howard Towle lived on the South Princeton Road at the top of Taylor Hill, west side of the road. His wife Mabel Towle would haul some scholars in the following year. Gerald Craft, son of Lester and Gladys (Perkins) Craft, lived at the top of Lanes Hill. Bertha (Frost) Dwelley was Frank’s wife. Norma Frost was a daughter of Lyston and Hazel mentioned in 1946 – 47.

School year 1949 – 50

Instruction: Gladys Kneeland at Four Corners School - $417.10, Marilyn Gillespie at Cedar School- $447.70, Edna MacArthur at Hale School - $1322.96, Zela Cousins at Four Corners School - $599.86, Dorothy Perkins at Cedar School - $604.06, Collector, Internal Revenue - $306.30, Maine State Retirement - $194.75

Conveyance: Howard E. Towle - $246.00, Mabel Towle - $30.00, Fenderson Insurance - $27.30

Tuition: Calais - $1200.00, Baileyville - $91.35, Princeton - $106.94

Supervision: Bernard B. Pierce, Supt. - $228.73, Floyd Hunnewell - $10.00, Robert Thistlewood - $5.00, Frank Dwelley - $5.00

Janitor and Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $79.00, Leota Worrell - $72.00, Norma Frost - $60.00, Carroll MacArthur - $2.00, Fay Mac Arthur - $10.00, Alice Perkins - $7.00, Rowena Dwelley - $7.00 Frank Dwelley for sanitation - $24.00

Fuel: Frank Dwelley - $254.00, Floyd Hunnewell for hauling - $4.00, Robert Thistlewood for hauling - $1.00, Dennys River Electric Coop. - $58.27

Cedar School had 11 scholars, Four Corners School had 24 including 6 from Crawford, and Hale School had 19 in attendance. Minimum salary for certified teachers was $1500.00 per year.

Dorothy (Antone) Perkins was Norman’s wife and lived on the North Union Road in Cooper. Carroll McArthur was Fay McArthur’s son. Carroll’s mother was Bertha ((Cheney). Alice Perkins, wife of Herbert and mother of Leota Worrell, lived at the top of Gooch Hill. Rowena Dwelley is mentioned above as Mrs. Paul Dwelley. Sanitation is a fancy term for cleaning out the outhouses(s).

School year 1950 - 51

Instruction: Zela Cousins - $1192.93, Dorothy Perkins - $433.90, Edna McArthur - $579.70, Marilyn Gillespie - $283.52, Evelyn Pottle - $746.80, Charlotte Smith - $209.44, Bertha Dwelley - $34.41, Agnes White - $173.18, Collector of Internal revenue - $287.40, MSRS - $221.65

Conveyance: Alberta Berry - $298.00, Fenderson Insurance - $44.27, State for Bus Signs - $1.93

Tuition-High School: Treasurer, City of Calais - $1278.34, Town of Princeton - $45.00

Supervision and Committee: Bernard B. Pierce, Supt. - $268.68, Robert Thistlewood (1951) - $10.00, Frank Dwelley (1952) - $5.00, Floyd Hunnewell (1953) - $5.00

Enrollment: Cedar School (District 3) – 11, Four Corners School – 21, Hale School – 17, Attending Calais High School – 17, Total enrollment 66

Janitors & Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $77.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $6.00, Bertha Dwelley - $14.00, Leota Worrell - $31.00, Fay McArthur - $32.00, Clifton Pottle $24.00, Anthony Braley - $ 16.00, John Perkins - $21.00, Harley Dwelley – $21.00, Zettie Frost - $4.00, Leonard Frost - $4.00, Belle Carlow - $4.00

Fuel: Frank Dwelley for 12 cords - $192.00, Floyd Hunnewell for 6 cords - $96.00, Robert Thistlewood for wood and labor - $5.00, Hubert Noyes for load of kindling - $18.00, Dennys River Electric Coop - $54.00

Charlotte Smith came to Meddybemps from Vermont with her husband, the first Harry Smith. Agnes (Berry) White, wife of Carter White, lived in Grand Lake Stream and boarded here in Alexander with Nelson Flood’s family while teaching at Cedar School. Alberta Berry, daughter of Ralph and Linnie (Cousins) McArthur was married to Max Berry and they lived at the Four Corners. Clifton Pottle is a son of Harold and Evelyn (Flood) Pottle. They lived on the Cooper Road. Anthony Braley was a son of Abner and Dora (Seavey) Braley. They lived on the Fred Brown place on the Spearin Road. Harley Dwelley is a son of Frank and Bertha (Frost) Dwelley from near Dwelleys Lake. Zettie Frost, Norma’s sister, lived with her parents Lyston and Hazel (Cousins) Frost on the Cooper road. Leonard Frost is the son of Leonard Cecil and Inez (Doten) Frost of the Flat Road. Belle Carlow, Elbridge McArthur’s mother-in-law, lived across from Cedar School on the top of Gooch Hill.

School year 1951-52

Instruction: Zela Cousins - $1448.60, Evelyn Pottle - $1411.03, Agnes White - $311.53, Lillian Varnum - $242.21, Dora Braley - $753.23, Collector Int. Rev. - $337.75, M. S. R. S. – $217.80

Conveyance: Alberta Berry - $401.00, Fenderson Agency, Insurance - $33.83

Tuition: City of Calais - $2491.67

Supervision and School Committee: Bernard B. Pierce, Supt. - $268.68, travel allowance - $29.19, Frank Dwelley - $10.00, Robert Thistlewood - $5.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $5.00

Janitors & Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $78.00, Zettie Frost - $38.00, Leonard Frost - $4.00, Belle Carlow - $28.00, Harley Dwelley - $24.00, Frank Dwelley - $8.00, Beulah Hunnewell - $8.00, Alice Perkins - $8.00, Clifton Pottle - $44.00, Fern Strout - $1.00, Muriel Frost $21.00, Fanny Dwelley - $8.00

Fuel: Joseph Lord - $2.00, Hubert Dwelley - $212.00, Harley Dwelley - $1.00, Clifton Pottle - $1.00, Everett Dwelley - $60.00, Dennys River Electric Coop - $54.00

Lillian Varnum was a daughter of True and Eda (Dwelley) Varnum. Dora Braley, described in 1950 – 51 was one of the 16 children of Ernest and Gertrude (Roberts) Seavey of Crawford. Beulah Hunnewell was Eldon’s wife. She was Beulah Travis. Fern Strout now is Fern Garner. She is the daughter of Lyman and Doris (Dwelley) Strout. Muriel Frost is a daughter of Donald and Helen (Stanhope) Frost. Their home was in Lanesbrook on the north side of the Airline. Fanny Dwelley was mother of Frank and Everett mentioned elsewhere in this article. Joe Lord came from New Brunswick. He married Althea Davis and lived in Crawford before moving to Alexander. Their Alexander house is now the home of the Joe Wallace family. Gordon Lord, author of A Country Boys View is their son. Everett Dwelley was a brother of Frank. He married Viola White, sister of Rowena Dwelley. They lived near Dwelleys Lake.

 

 

ALEXANDER’S ONE ROOM SCHOOLS

By Pliney Frost

Part 12

We continue with information collected by Pliney in 1982. He did not show insurance, repairs account or textbooks and supplies. This twelfth article concludes the history of our one-room schools. As editor, I would like to stop here so we can collect more information about the Consolidated School opened in 1956 at the corner of the Cooper and Arm roads. Specifically, I hope to create a list of the students who attended the school and to get copies of the group pictures. Please check you files and if you have one or more of these pictures, let me know at 454-7476. jd

1952 at the Four Corners School

This building is showing wear and tear in this photograph. Even so, it became the Village Store after the scholars were moved to the consolidated schoolhouse in 1957. This image shows some of the older children. From the left we have Virginia Hunnewell (Carlow), Alberta Perkins (James), Ella Hunnewell (Howe), Charlotte Strout (McArthur), Ben McArthur, Richard Hunnewell is behind Ken Berry, and Richard Berry is on the right. Virginia’s son Foster Carlow, Jr. loaned the image and Ken Berry’s job of identifying was made easy by the initials marked on the original.

 

School year 1952-53

Instruction: Zela Cousins - $1420.40, Evelyn Pottle - $588.88, Dora Braley - $494.80, Bertha Dwelley - $707.20, Dorothy Perkins - $32.50, Alice Gillespie - $325.55, Kathleen Church - $278.25, Col. Int. Rev. - $300.31, M. S. R. S. - $201. 95 (Maine State Retirement System)
Conveyances: Alberta Berry - $402.50

Tuition: City of Calais - $2,472.84

Supervision and School Committee: J. Raymond Brennick, Supt. Salary $268.68 and travel - $50.00

Floyd Hunnewell - $10.00, Robert Thistlewood - $5.00, Everett Dwelley - $5.00

Janitor and Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $80.00, Zettie Frost - $40.00, Muriel Frost - $13.00, Clifton Pottle - $28.00, Viola Dwelley - $8.00, Verna Thistlewood - $8.00, Fern Strout - $17.00, Harley Dwelley - $42.00

Fuel: Floyd Hunnewell - $5.00, Nelson Flood - $272.00, Dennys River Electric Coop - $48.48

Zela (Wallace) Cousins (1904 – 2000) lived on the Airline with her husband Harold. Evelyn (Flood) Pottle, daughter of Lincoln and Lizzie (Perkins) Flood was living at her parents’ home on the Cooper Road. Her mother and her husband Harold Pottle lived there also. She had taken time from teaching after the birth of her first child, Clifton. Abner and Dora (Seavey) Braley lived on the Fred Brown place on the Spearin Road. Dora Braley, described in 1950 – 51, was one of the 16 children of Ernest and Gertrude (Roberts) Seavey of Crawford. Bertha Dwelley, Frank’s wife, lived down near the mill at the outlet of Dwelley’s Lake. She was a daughter of Thomas and Dora (McGraw) Frost. Dorothy (Antone) Perkins was Norman’s wife and lived on the North Union Road in Cooper. Alice (Patten) Gillespie was Roy Gillespie’s widow and mother of Marilyn Gillespie who had taught at Cedar School from 1948 – 1951. Both lived in Meddybemps. Kay Church was the daughter of W. C. ‘Bill’ and Bessie (Wallace) Cushing of Crawford. She and her husband, Chuck, also lived in Crawford. Alberta Berry, daughter of Ralph and Linnie (Cousins) McArthur was married to Max Berry and they lived at the Four Corners. Floyd and Ethel (Knowles) Hunnewell lived on the Airline near the Four Corners School, diagonally across from Max and Alberta. Robert and Verna (Craft) Thistlewood lived next to her parents at the top of Lanes Hill. Everett and Viola (White) Dwelley lived by Dwelley’s Lake. Everett, Frank, and Doris Strout were siblings, children of Llewellyn and Fannie (Fenlason) Dwelley. Viola had come to Alexander with her family from Weld when the Stowell MacGregor spool bar mill opened on Pocomoonshine Lake in 1933. Often older students would do janitor’s work, building and tending the fire, getting a pail of water, and sweeping up at the end of the day. These five did that work in 1952 – 53. Zettie and Muriel Frost were cousins; Zettie a daughter of Lyston and Hazel (Cousins) Frost and Muriel a daughter of Donald and Helen (Stanhope) Frost. Donald was a brother of Bertha Dwelley. They lived near Hale School. Clifton Pottle attended Cedar School and was one of three sons of Evelyn and Harold Pottle. Fern Strout was a daughter of Lyman and Doris (Dwelley) Strout and went to Hale School. Harley Dwelley was a son of Frank and Bertha and went to Cedar School. Nelson Flood lived at the south end of town where he ran a store. His wife Leota (Cousins) died on November 23, 1953 at age 46; a sad year for Nelson.

 

School year 1953-54

Instruction: Zela. Cousins - $1493.60, Kathleen Church - $434.80, Bertha Dwelley - $1,244.25, Kathleen Cushing - $70.30, Lillian Varnum - $638.13, Dir. Int. Revenue - $322.15, MSRS - $254.55

Conveyance: no mention in report

Tuition: City of Calais - $1,747.10

Supervision: J. Raymond Brennick for salary $246.03, for travel $56.67, Carroll R. McGary, Salary –

$33.33, School Committee: Robert Thistlewood (1954) - $25.00, Everett Dwelley (1955) - $5.00,
Ben McArthur (1956) - $13.00

Janitor and Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $80.00, Zettie Frost - $14.00, Fern Strout - $14.00, Harley Dwelley - $28.00, Donald Frost - $41.20, Jackie McArthur - $40.00, Gerald Craft - $26.00, Verna Thistlewood - $8.00, Jackie Frost - $4.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $2.00, Ben McArthur - $2.00, Robert Thistlewood - $10.00

Fuel: Floyd Hunnewell - $294.00, Robert Thistlewood - $2.00, Dennys River Electric Coop - $79.15

Lillian Varnum was a daughter of True and Eda (Dwelley) Varnum. Lillian never married and wanted to become an opera singer; she even had her stage name, Alexa Barin. She was back in the local area not only to teach, but also to look after her mother who had been widowed for 30 years; Eda died at the Calais Hospital in June 1954. Lillian may have lived with Leon and Bertha Scribner or with her Aunt Carrie (Dwelley) Varnum. Benjamin Harrison McArthur was one of Fay and Bertha (Cheney) McArthur’s sons. He married Constance Rice of West Pembroke who we will meet later in this article. They lived on the McArthur Road. Jackie McArthur is a daughter of Elbridge and Barbara (Carlow) McArthur and lived across from Cedar School. We will meet Barbara in the next section. Gerald Craft, son of Lester Craft and Gladys (Perkins) Craft, lived with his parents at the top of Lanes Hill. He was a brother of Verna who married Robert Thistlewood. Who was Jackie Frost?

 

School year 1954-55
Instruction: Bertha Dwelley, Cedar School (District 3) - $1529.15, Zela Cousins, Four Corners School - $1667.75, Lillian Varnum - $542.50, Kathleen Church, Hale School. (District 2) - $970.45, Director of Internal Revenue - $398.68, Maine State Retirement System - $270.35
Conveyance: no expense listed

Tuition: Town of Baileyville - $71.95, City of Calais - $2,450.00, Town of Windham - $267.35
Supervision: Supt. Carroll R. McGary, salary - $399.96 School Committee: Everett Dwelley - $10.00
Benj. McArthur - $5.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $5.00

Janitor and Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $88.00, Jackie McArthur - $32.00, Donald Frost - $90.80, Fannie Dwelley - $8.00, Elden Hunnewell - $10.00, Barbara McArthur - $56.00, Joyce Craft - $7.00, Constance McArthur - $7.00, Gerald Craft - $24.00

Fuel: Floyd Hunnewell - $102.00, Everett Dwelley - $60.00, Benj. McArthur - $85.00, Dennys River Electric Coop. $54.00, State of Maine for water test - $11.80

Who went to school in Windham? Fannie (Fenlason) Dwelley was Llewellyn’s wife and the mother of Doris, Wayne, Harold, Frank, and Everett. She lived down by Dwelley’s Lake (Pleasant Lake). Elden Hunnewell, son of Morey and Marjorie (James) lived with his parents on Bailey Hill near the Four Corners. Joyce (Crandall) Craft was from Oakfield and was married to Gerald Craft mentioned above. After Gerald died, she married Pliney Frost and would be known by many locals by the Frost name.

 

School year 1955-56
Instruction: Zela Cousins, Four Corners School - $1,630.86, Bertha Dwelley, Cedar - $1,630.86, Jennie Gray, Hale School - $1114.21, Kathleen Church, Hale School) - $ 522.55, Director of Internal Revenue $412.00, Maine State Retirement System - $311.92, Maine Teachers Association - $15.00, Washington County Teachers Association - $3.00
Conveyance: No amount listed

Tuition: Town of Baileyville - $223.61, City of Calais - $2,471.40
Supervision: Supt. Carroll R. McGary, Salary - $483.36 School Committee: Benjamin. McArthur - $10.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $5.00, Everett Dwelley - $5.00
Enrollments: Four Corners School - 10, Hale School – 20, Cedar School – 12, Calais High - 10

Janitor and Cleaning: Ethel Hunnewell - $98.00, Barbara McArthur - $92.44, Donald Frost - $32.50, Lloyd Dwelley - $57.50, Viola Dwelley - $8.00, Gerald Craft - $24.00, Constance McArthur - $6.00, Joyce Craft - $6.00

Fuel: Floyd Hunnewell - $102.00, Everett Dwelley - $85.00, Benjamin McArthur - $102.00, Dennys River Electric Coop - $114.01

Jennie (Merritt) Gray was born in Deblois in 1918. Besides teaching in Alexander, she taught in Plantation #21, Calais, Columbia Falls, Milbridge, and Ellsworth. She was a substitute teacher through 2003, the year of her death. Lloyd Thomas Dwelley is a son of Paul and Rowena (White) Dwelley. He lives today on Gooch Hill.

 

School year 1956 – 57

Superintendent Adolph Zukowski made two observations in his report to the Citizens of Alexander on March 5, 1957. "The citizens may well be proud of their new school building… and The Town of Cooper is now sending their elementary pupils to Alexander on a tuition basis.

Instruction: Zela Cousins - $1674.15, Bertha Dwelley - $1674.15, Jennie Gray - $ 603.19, Director of Internal Revenue - $371.60 Maine State Retirement System - $266.41

Conveyance: Donald Frost - $1,213.00, Dyer Crosby - $182.00

Tuition: City of Calais - $4,507.98

Tuition received from Cooper: $687.50

Supervision: Supt. Carroll McGary, Salary - $175.12, Supt. Adolph M. Zukowski - $350,24, School Committee: Floyd Hunnewell (1957) - $10.00, Everett Dwelley (1958) - $5.00, Lawrence Frost (1959) - $5.00

Janitor and Cleaning: Barbara McArthur - $23.50, Ethel Hunnewell - $44.50, Lloyd Dwelley - $32.50, Joyce Craft - $5.00, Connie McArthur - $5.00, Bertha Dwelley - $5.00, Donald Frost - $240.00, Bertha Scribner - $3.50

Fuel: Barbara McArthur - $10.00, Floyd Hunnewell - $6.00, Paul Dwelley - $2.00, James Pomeroy - $296.48, Lyman Williams - $3.00, Dyer Crosby - $10.00, Dennys River Electric Coop - $80.31, State of Maine (water test?) - $9.00

Dyer Crosby lived in the first house in Cooper where his widow still resides. He conveyed Cooper and Alexander scholars to Alexander. Readers will note that Cooper paid tuition to Alexander, and that that again is happening. Lawrence Frost, a son of Lyston and Hazel (Cousins) Frost lived on the south side if the Airline, on Bailey Hill. Bertha Scribner, wife of Leon, lived on the Airline and about this time she and Leon were running the former Charlie Brown store on Cooper Road. Paul Dwelley, son of Delmont and Clara (Dunham) Dwelley lived at the home place at the top of Spring Hill on the Cooper Road. James Pomeroy lived in Calais. Lyman Williams was married to Rose Niles and they lived at the old H. A. Crafts house at 51 Arm Road.

 

 CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL

Note: The two room consolidated school was built in 1956 at the corner of the Cooper and Arm Roads and the one room schools in Districts numbers 1, 2 and 3 were closed. Thus we record the demise of the one room school in Alexander for twenty years.

 

March 1, 1954: Hand written in the front of this Annual Report: "To see what action if any the Town will vote to take in Regards to keeping one of the Old School Buildings for a town office Building. Also what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for repair of said building."

 

March 4, 1955: Article 39: "To see if the Town will vote to elect a School Building Committee whose function will be to investigate and report to the town on the possibility of building a school. Said committee to consist one member of the Board of Selectmen, one member of the Superintending School Committee and three other members chosen at large."

 

March 5, 1956: Superintendent Carroll McGary’s report included, "In all probability the question of whether the town will build a new school or not will have been settled before this report reaches you. Regardless…. The money needed to run the schools next year will be the same. The following indicates that the committee had decided to build a new school.

Washington County (deeds) - $2.00 and John Adams (plans) - $25.00

 

March 5, 1957: Article 32: "To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2134.76 to be paid to the Maine School Building authority pursuant to the provisions of the lease agreement dated February 1, 1956. Article 33: "To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1300.00 to pay the remaining bills due on the new building."